Can I ask questions to the staff about my Mom's care i.e. who her nurse was at present and for the next shift when I'm not there?

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Can I ask who my Moms nurse and CNA are the shift before? Or on the very same day? My Mom is in a nursing home. I've asked about her every night after I leave for three months and all of the sudden one nurse blocked me from the information. She said it was against the hippocratic oath? Later on that early a.m. she said she would have to recheck the rules but that she felt as if that was a violation of her fellow employees privacy. I'm not kidding. It was nice for me to know who her incoming nurse would be if they knew and to know that the sweet CNA's they have would be there too.

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Wow, I frequently tell my patients who thier night shift RT will be.. we try to "build a relationship" in this new healthcare system. Never knew I was violating any rules...LOL Just thought I was being helpful!
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Of course everyone in their jobs should be in an environment free of harassment and discrimination. However, Knowing the people who are caring for your loved ones is not a form of discrimination nor is it a form of harassment. And I would be a little leery of people caring for my Mom or Dad who would felt that way. Families have the right to know that information. It's not a secret. Every facility has in their Nursing Administration Office copies of "Families Right To Know" pamphlets which states the same. Everyone's free to ask for a copy.
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CNAs have the right to work in an environment that is free from discrimination and harassment by supervisors, co-workers and patients. Asking their name could be interpreted as targeting them for discriminatory reasons, presuming guilt before they even start their shift.
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KK, I'm not suggesting you stick your head in the sand and hope for the best, I'm merely cautioning against micromanaging and unwittingly alienating staff.
I'm looking at the reality of staffing at many facilities, be they long term care or assisted living, from the worker's viewpoint. Staff changes. Those on evenings usually get a chance to work afternoon or morning shifts too. Those on one wing or floor my be shifted to another to cover sick days or to more evenly distribute the workload. I expect that no matter who is working they are trained and competent. Of course we all want the cheerful, bubbly caregiver, but the silently efficient person can get the job done too. And yes, there are those who should find another job, but if they are causing a problem it is better to mention that to the person in charge and request the the time they spend with your loved one is limited, if there are enough complaints about a certain staff member then they will likely be let go or at least watched closely.
I agree this nurse overstepped her bounds and came off sounding like a fool by quoting erroneous regulations. She may just be a b#$%!, but I wonder if she is only voicing a concern heard from her co workers.
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To "cwillie: It is EXTREMELY important to be aware of who's caring for your loved one! And asking questions in regards to her care frequently and staying on top of her well-being can give you peace that she is being well cared for. It is also important that the staff realizes that her family is carefully involved and they will surely need to answer to the family if something doesn't seem right. ALWAYS ask questions and make family very visible.
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Wow. It shocks me that that nurse didn't know the difference between Hippocratic Oath and Hippa Laws. It also scares me that she is responsible for residents there. YES YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO KNOW! Had this been my mother, you can bet I would be in the NUrsing Administration Office on the next elevator. And I would request that this nurse not be involved in my Mother's care. YOU ALSO HAVE THAT RIGHT.
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Why don't you ask the social worker or DON about who scheduled to work with your mom?
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I can kind of see the nurse's point, it shouldn't matter who is working around your mom. The fact you are constantly asking may make some of the staff feel you are checking up on them and being judgmental about their work, especially if you make it obvious that you are pleased when "Sue" is working but are disappointed when "Betty" is on for the night.
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Yes. She is there on private pay so far.
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