Follow
Share

Mom has dementia since March 2016, crazy sister had Mom change her Will to leave New Hampshire house to her only. Mom has 7 other children. I am her legal guardian, (she lives with me in Oregon) can I change the Will ?

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
You should contact an attorney. It smells fishy what the crazy sister did.
Helpful Answer (11)
Report

One more idea. Why don’t you sell the house now?

Check your guardianship agreement to see if you currently have the authority to act on this now. If not, you’ll likely have to petition the court that granted guardianship for permission. You would need to present to the court that your mother has a financial need for the revenue the house sale would bring. I see that your mother is living with you - but it would be very easy to reason that should she need more care than you could provide the cash would be needed. Even if you never plan to place your mother outside your home - the court doesn’t need to know that.
And again - this is assuming Medicaid is not a factor. 
Helpful Answer (9)
Report

Simple answer to the simple question: no. Nobody can change a person's will except the person who made the will.

As your mother's guardian, you can challenge the validity of the new will if you can show that your sister co-oerced your mother or exerted undue influence, or that your mother was not competent to know what she was doing. The previous will would then stand. Bizarrely, you would in effect be challenging your mother on your mother's behalf, in order to protect her from herself. But stranger things have happened in the law.

Alternatively, I think Rainmom's idea of liquidating this asset now is inspired.
Helpful Answer (8)
Report

What does mom want?
Having dementia doesn’t necessarily make mom incompetent but since you are her guardian then that ship may have sailed.
I agree with polar bear, see a qualified elder attorney. If your mom has many years of care to go you may find she needs Medicaid at some point. If that happens the house could have a lien placed on it. A good lawyer can guide you. You may have to see the home for her care. 
Helpful Answer (7)
Report

You can't change it, but if you can show she was no longer in her right mind when the crazy sister had it changed, you can have that codicil nullified.
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

Do you have a copy of the previous will? No, legally you can't change the will back to what it said earlier as her guardian, but you can see a lawyer about your concerns.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

It may depend on your states laws. Generally I would say nothing can be done without the courts approval. Definitely get an elder care lawyer and get the real facts.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

Great ideas for you, Supermom. I got with Mom's lawyer and paved the way for Mom to sign a Transfer on Death deed for Mom's house listing us kids as beneficiaries. It was easy and quick. Once recorded by the city/county, this deed supersedes the will.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

I am an estate planning and elder law attorney in North Carolina. I am not licensed to practice law in any other state, and this reply is not legal advice (usual disclaimer - sorry!) If you are a Court-appointed guardian, you cannot make any changes to your ward's assets without the Court's express approval. In many states, you also are prohibited from making changes to life insurance beneficiaries, account ownership or anything else that has the effect of changing the ultimate path that assets would take at death. That road is just too often taken with ill intent. I agree with a previous reply that any change of assets should consider impact on Medicaid and other benefits, if applicable to her situation. If you believe that your mother was taken advantage of, one option is  to petition the Court to set aside the Will on the basis on undue influence. You can also gather medical information with the goal of challenging the Will after your mother's death. But immediate action to at least no your options is best. Consult with a local attorney for more detailed information and advice.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

No one but a qualified estate planning attorney can properly advise you on this matter. Taking the advice of unqualified persons could create bigger problems for you because the laws vary from state to state and what might be legal in one state may not be legal in your state. Your question is not simple. While no one can change someone else’s will, there may be legal ways of invalidating the codicil. Every state has rules about what guardians are authorized to do without specific permission from the Court. For example, in California, you can’t sell real property without first asking for permission from the Court. The same is true of estate planning and based on certain criteria. But that may be different in your state. Best to contact an attorney so you don’t accidentally make a decision that ends up hurting you or be used against you later.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

See All Answers
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.