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This adult child of your care recipient... Assuming there's nothing in your contract about it...

What cleaning? Cleaning the child's house? Forget it!

Going to fetch him and taking him home again... Mnmnmn. Not really.

Catering for him if his father invites him to supper? Well, if cooking for your care recipient is part of your job, then arguably that's reasonable.

You say your care recipient is closely related to your employer. What relationship exists between your employer and the adult child, then?

As long as you were properly paid for the additional time you spend on the adult child, would you particularly mind the extra work?
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AnitaKane Jul 18, 2019
Nothing is metioned on care plan regarding clients Adult child. Client I provide care for is a Grandparent to the owner of company that I work for.
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What!!! Are you crazy 😝
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No it’s not your problem...you have enough to do. Are they invalids? What is in care plan? I was under the impression you are family member...but after reading further replies, you are outsider? Depends on care plan.
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AnitaKane Jul 17, 2019
Wow, I just realized that I need to up date my profile. I no longer care for my Grandfather. Currently employed with an agency . Accepted an ongoing assignment for a client who is unrelated to myself. However care recipient is immediate relation to owner of the agency that employes me.
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I have explained before that the Caregiver is only responsible for the Client.

We had a client (I worked for a VNA) that the wife complained that an aide she received did not clean, do laundry or dishes. My boss said, as long as there are others in the household, the aide is not responsible for cleaning, laundry and dishes. If the client lived alone, then the aide was responsible to do light housekeeping, dishes and laundry.

If your responsibilities were not discussed during hire, its time to discuss them now. Start with, ordinarily ....
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According to your profile, you are caring for your grandfather. If thats the case, I would tell my family no if I didnt want to do it.

If you are a paid caregiver, depending on who pays for the care would determine the answer. The caregivers we had constantly complained about family making messes and leaving dirty dishes. Medicaid actually paid for colored dishes for the client so the caregivers would not have to clean up after others. Side note, I did think it was petty when they refused to poor a cup of coffee for the clients husband when the cup was less than 6 inches away.
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AnitaKane Jul 17, 2019
In my situation the client I care for has a grown adult child (maintains own residence) that Im expected to transport in my own vehicle over to visit. Arrives hungry with laundry in tow.
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The caregiver agencies I've spoke to offered exactly that. I need someone to look after grandma for a few hours here and there. I said there's really not much to do other than safety, change diapers and transfers on and off a wheelchair. The agencies said that the caregiver could take my dad to run errands or house keep or just hang out with mom to fill out the time.

So as others said, I would speak to whoever signs your paycheck. Since it's really up to them.
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Reply to needtowashhair
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I think I'd ask the person who signs your paycheck for some clarification on just who you are supposed to be taking care of. If it's more than the one person you initially began caring for, I'd demand more money or walk.
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AnitaKane Jul 17, 2019
Sent an email requesting clarification early this morning. Have yet to reply.
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AnitaKane, I agree with worriedinCali's post. What does your employment contract state?

I have a feeling there is no employment contract, right? It is probably too late to have one drawn up because the family somehow will throw in chores that they want you to do for the rest of the family members.

Your job is just for the recipient, and anything else would be of your own choice.

If this is getting too overwhelming with other family members pulling at you, time to give two weeks notice.
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Reply to freqflyer
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No, not unless you are being privately paid and its stipulated in your employment contract.
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AnitaKane Jul 17, 2019
Employed by an agency .
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