Arthritic pain. Any advice?

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My mom has arthritis in her legs/knees. She is 95. She takes Tylenol, and has steroid shots every couple of months. The shots wear off within a few weeks. I notice her feet roll inward... Lack of arches... And wonder if orthopedic shoes might help; perhaps if her legs were straighter they wouldn't hurt so much. Neither her foot dr, family doctor, or ortho dr has ever recommended. Looking for suggesting a to ease her pain. Whirlpools are not an option. She walks with a cane for balance, but constantly complains how much her legs hurt...
Thanks!

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I'm so glad to read this thread and see the serious thought going into controlling arthritis pain. My mother used to hate those ads for aspirin talking about the "aches and pains" of arthritis as if this pain is a little “bother.” Arthritis pain can be excruciating and when people get to be your mother's age, surgery isn't an option. Looking for other help is.

I like the idea of inserts in her shoes if her toes and other foot joints can handle it. My mother had to go with Velcro closing slippers because she couldn't stand anything touching her joints. Those, of course, didn't give her any support. Her pronation came from the fact that her knees had collapsed. It really had nothing to do with her arches. Knee braces helped a lot (the elastic type, preferably with "stays" along the sides for extra support. They can't be worn for too many hours but they can help a lot.

Talk with the doctor about Tramadol for pain. It's stronger than Tylenol (there are much more effective meds even OtC than Tylenol), easy on the stomach and at 95 they shouldn't have any worries about addiction (this is very low on the scale for that anyway). Yes, it’s an Rx but the generic is inexpensive.

My dad had a pain patch that helped his arthritic spine some, so that is something to consider, too.

We need to do a better job of pain management for our elders. I'm sometimes appalled at the attitude of doctors who are afraid to give an elderly patient medication because they are afraid of addiction. I doubt that they'd feel the same if the situation were reversed.

Bobbi48128 - and all the rest of you - thank you from the bottom of my heart for caring so much. Keep seeking out medical advice as well as practical advice from caregivers. It wouldn't hurt to talk with a good chiropractor, either. Some of them are well versed in pain control that is non-invasive.

Take care, all of you wonderful people.
Carol
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You have been given some great suggestions, so I'm taking another track which may or may not help... we're all a bit different chemically. I'm not a health professional, but have experience of many years. (age 76 and have had 3 joint replacements.) I also had lower back and neck pain from degenerated discs, but back surgery is more complex so I put up with the pain because it wasn't constant, but associated with moving those parts. Adding turmeric to my diet was the biggest help. It can cause gas so has to be introduced slowly, starting with a pea-size bit. I now take a heaping teaspoon in my morning oatmeal. For someone in their nineties, taking a pill with turmeric EXTRACT might be a better route; do some Internet research. I also use "Ceylon cinnamon" - the cheap types are NOT good for your liver if taken daily; in fact they are not real cinnamon. What cured the lower back and neck pain was a surprise to me because I'd always (silently) pooh-poohed people's praise of going gluten-free. However I found myself in a gluten-free household two years ago and politely ate what they ate for ten days. It was only after I got home that it registered that my pains were gone. Worth trying. As I said, we're not all chemically alike. Most important if you try the nutrition approach: you have to establish an "everyday" pattern, which is why breakfast is the best "delivery system"... And start slow... food is powerful. I also stay away from sugar and sugar-substitutes and use stevia, an herb, instead. I found the best to be NOW brand (or Trader Joe's). It's a white powder. I don't care for the metallic taste of the liquid forms I've tried. Beware brands which boast "pure stevia" or "all stevia"... you can only tell by reading the "Ingredients" small print which should say simply "stevia" "or certified organic stevia". It's expensive, but you use only tiny amounts. After many years, I now by it by the pound (via mail; Swanson Vitamins.)
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If her podiatrist hasn't noticed the foot imbalance, you might want to look around and find one who's more thorough. A few years ago I was able to find one who's been better than any we've used before. Most just clip, clip, clip and goodbye, but this doctor is not only cordial and asks about other health issues, she always checks for a pedal pulse. She's the first podiatrist who's done that.

Same with the orthopedist; I would think he/she would have noticed the pronation of your mom's feet. You could try making an appointment specifically to address that issue, even with another orthopedist if you don't have confidence in your current one.

But be prepared - I'm not sure if orthotics are covered by Medicare, and years ago when I got some they were very expensive. And then they didn't fit and just caused leg pain so I couldn't wear them anyway.

Another thing you can try is checking out what's available in the Dr. Scholl shoe insert line; the gel soles are really comfortable. Some of these inserts might help stabilize your mother's foot, but I would really check with an orthopedist first before even trying these.
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Glad to see some natural solutions offered! My father and friends his age for years took a blend of honey and cider vinegar (definitely not the white vinegar) - he swore it kept his arthritis at bay. I believe tablets are also available if you don't want to use the liquids.
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My reply may be naive but, have you tried salt water baths? Ginger root is recommended for this problem. I use it in my juicer. I also put some slices of ginger root in a jar of honey and drink some every day. Raw garlic is also good. There are many other natural treatments. Wishing you well.
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Inserts and lidocaine patches work for mom.
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OK I have two slightly "different" suggestions. For the pronation, consider a running shoe store - where they have folks that specialize in how someone's feet strike the ground. Runners are very much into that type of thing. Or a sports rehab place. They might be able to look at your mom's feet to give you some ideas on shoes/inserts.

For the arthritis, I'm a big proponent of turmeric. I've been using it for almost a year and I've quit having my knees drained and I don't need the steroid shots either. There are a ton of clinical studies on the efficacy of turmeric and it helps with many conditions - it cuts inflammation. It's been added to food for thousands of years in India. I take a daily 500 mg supplement with piperine (black pepper) to increase its bioavailability. But if your mom is on blood thinners, check with her doctor first, as it can change their absorption.
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Does Crestor cause some of these pains that we might think are arthritis?
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Yes, u may want to consider cholesterol meds. Lipator is known for causing problems. If Mom is having problems with both legs consider a walker. A cane is only good if one leg is a problem. When usung a cane the good leg takes a lot of abuse. A walker will even things out and she will be more stable. Have a professional adjust the height. Mom has been using the same walker for a couple of years and thru OT with it. Just started OT again and this therapist adjusted it higher.
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I am so glad the STAYIN drugs were mentioned. I am on celexa for nerve pain and lyrica. I changed from Lipitor to Crestor but recently read about statin drugs, I intend to call my doc about this after the holidays because the 2 nerve blocks I just had did nothing! I also take percocet and muscle relaxants and Nsaid (i take so many Meds it is horrible. Chronic pain sucks the life out of you! Merry Christmas and happy new yesr to all 🎄🎉
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