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My mother refuses to take her medicine some days. Since it is things like anti seizure and thyroid, it’s important she have them. Anything to make the process easier would help!

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I know in the NH they offer the meds in either applesauce or pudding (I guess it depends on what your mother likes).  It also depends on whether you can crush the pills, some pills you should never crush and if that's the case, maybe find out if that particular medicine can come in liquid form and be put into her drink.  Do not call it candy, just say how about some applesauce or pudding and give her the first spoonful then (if she can) let her finish the rest on her own.  wishing you luck
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Reply to wolflover451
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Tell her the Dr said to take them and you will have to call the Dr or go in if she doesnt.

Bribe her with something.
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Reply to bevthegreat
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My mom's memory care facility nurses will grind up and put in her coffee or ice cream! Has made a huge difference for her to have regular meds! She would refuse them previously. Good luck!
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Reply to Carolinechcs
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Imho, this question should be directed to your mother's physician.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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My husband has dementia. I think he is in the later stages and has regressed a lot in the past year. Now it is becoming more difficult to feed him, so I have to put pudding on the tip of the spoon and then put the regular food towards the back. This often works quite well. Also, it is very difficult to get him to take his meds. I have tried coaxing him and have even used the hospital threat with him but none of this registers. What works best with him is mixing his crushed medications with pudding. This way, he will take all his meds without a hassle!
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Reply to Edna2019
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renoir Oct 13, 2020
Always check with pharmacist to know if meds can be crushed. Some meds can become toxic when crushed as they release too much med too quickly and other reasons. Good tip about pudding to assist with ease of swallowing meds. My dad had to have meds not crushed but pudding helped, one pill at at time.
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Sometimes a doctor can presribe medication in liquid form and it gets mixed into a food the patient likes. Or, a caregiver can mash meds and mix them into food.
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Reply to Hallyndee15
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renoir Oct 13, 2020
Always check with pharmacist to learn if meds can be crushed, some medications can become toxic if not digested in whole form.
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You have to be careful about putting meds in food because there are many kinds that cannot be split or crushed or are capsules and must be taken in tact. Talk to her doctor and see if some of her meds come in liquid form. That will certainly help if you want to try putting them in food or drink. Also, you can use a little white lie to get her to take them. Tell her that they're vitamins. Sometimes seniors will get fussy about taking medications because they think they don't need them. Last resort if she refuses to take them is tell her that if she doesn't take her medicine she will get sick and will have to go to a nursing home. This one always works.
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Reply to BurntCaregiver
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I had good luck with putting them in hot cocoa for my father. You do have to make sure the heat won’t affect the meds and make the cocoa extra chocolatey.
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Reply to glendj
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Thyroid medication must be taken with water and no food. You may crush her thyroid medications and mix with water. Have her drink it down. Time release medications cannot be crushed. Most other medications can be crushed and mixed with pudding or applesauce. Check with your pharmacist first before doing so. Also check with your doctor if there are liquid versions of medications which she might take more easily.
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Reply to Taarna
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Talk to her doctor about options. Time release pills should not be crushed. Some capsules can be opened. A patch may be the answer. Call her doc.
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Reply to sjplegacy
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I just cleaned out the dresser drawers in mom's house (she passed in July). I found so many pills in amongst the clothes. Apparently she was hiding them instead of taking them. Dad did not watch mom to make sure she took them, just placed them in a cup on the nightstand. But, I think if he had watched her, she had just enough of a determined independent streak that she probably would have refused to take them at all and there would have been horrible fights. It is a tough spot to be in.

I agree that many pills should not be crushed or capsules opened. I would definitely look into the patch if it is available for any of your mom's important meds.
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Reply to graygrammie
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If I told Luz they were her vitamins I had very little trouble. I also crushed them and mixed them into her pudding or ice cream.
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Reply to OldSailor
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Start by asking your pharmacist if the meds come in patch form. Please know that some medications say to never crush or break them in half as this impacts any time-released aspect and the patient may get too much medication all at once. Also, many medications are incredibly bitter when crushed and no foods cover up that taste (learned this the hard way when trying to give adult son pain meds after tonsillectomy-from-h*ll). Ask the pharmacist for ideas.
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Reply to Geaton777
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LoopyLoo Oct 9, 2020
Off the main subject, but I had a tonsillectomy at 27. “From H*ll” is putting it mildly! I knew it would be bad, but I had no idea how bad. I didn’t eat for a month aside from water, maybe some applesauce, and pain pills.
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This has been a continual issue with my dad. Now that he's in skilled nursing, you'd think they'd be able to get him to take them. Nope! I do know they have crushed them up and put them in his favorite beverage or some pudding.
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Reply to Babs75
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For my dad we crushed all pills and hid in his applesauce or pudding. This worked very well.
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Reply to InFamilyService
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DH aunt, 94 and with dementia, takes quiet a few pills each morning. Over the years we have had some issues that created a need to change things up. Currently we have them divided up into three pill planners and pace them a bit.

First Thyroid. Wait at least 30 min.
While waiting, go to the bathroom, get dressed, tend to hair, teeth and eye drops.

Next check vitals. “Oh I see your blood pressure is a little high”. She doesn’t want high blood pressure so she takes those. We are still in the bedroom.

Now at this point if she doesn’t take the next group, I don’t care. They are memory pills, multi vitamin, antidepressant. Allergy.

I invite her to the kitchen where the last group of pills are waiting in a little bowl. I busy myself with making her decaf and chatting. She sees the pills in the dish and starts taking them. I don’t mention them.

I find it much easier for her to not present them all at one time, to lead with the most important and to not offer food until they are taken.
If she eats too soon she feels too full to drink a lot of water taking the pills. That’s my theory anyway.
your mom’s meds May need to be taken differently but it works well for aunt.

Sometimes a silly song helps adjust her mood. That’s usually related to getting dressed. We will talk about the need to get dressed before heading out to a fantasy day. Chattanooga choo choo or New York, New York whatever comes to mind. Once she makes it into her chair (her goal for the day) she feels more empowered to reject her meds.

So I try to keep it all upfront “your chores for the day are almost done” until we get the pills done and get her dressed.

If the pills are offered after she gets in her chair, they may sit there all day and when they are gone you wonder if she really took them. She takes about a dozen so I know it can be a challenge.
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Reply to 97yroldmom
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