Are the Social Security payments I receive considered "income" for Medicaid eligibility?

Follow
Share

If not, what exactly is the definition of income?

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
14

Answers

Show:
Jax, You asked about "Social Security payments I receive." Are you asking whether your social security payments are considered income to you in your OWN application for Medicaid? If so, yes, Social Security payments are income.
If you are asking if your personal social security payments are considered income of your spouse, then the answer is "not necessarily." If you are asking if your social security payments effect someone else applying for Medicaid--say your parents who live with you--I think not.
Medicaid limits vary from state to state. You need to ask a Medicaid specialist in the state of the applicant's residence.
As someone else mentioned, an attorney who specializes in Elder Law will be worth a visit. Most of them will meet with you for a free initial consultation.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Under Medicaid law, an applicant is allowed $2,000 of countable assests.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

What I was trying to say is that my mom has been in assisted living for a year now and Medicaid leaves her so little to live on. Like $70 monthly, of course dad's retirement just went up 13.59 more a month, so that will in return raises her rent at the facility. No one in there right mind (like my brother) can sit by and think well hey! 70 will be fine because her rent, utilities, tv, 3 meals a day( which by the way I wouldn't feed 80% of it to my dog!!) she'll b fine with that much. But what bro doesn't get is with that amount toilet paper, papertowels, clothes,phone, any food for her room, I could go on and on. That is what he doesn't get neither does the "goverment"
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

If V A income is not taxable as it not considered income from previous work but from military service, why should SS be taxable as insurance?.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

SS Income IS counted as income for Medicaid eligibility. But do not worry. There are ways to get around a high monthly income. I did this for my Mom last year:

Depending on your state, if your SS income is the only income you receive, and you want to apply for Medicaid, your monthly entry must be under $2,200 (or so). My Mom received much more than that from her SS.

Elder lawyers have a way to get around that: they will establish a Trust where the excess monthly funds will be deposited so that you are below the maximum income amount received monthly. This Trust fund is for Medicaid and the accumulating funds will go to Medicaid upon death of the person.

Aside from that, again depending on the state, the person applying for Medicaid can also have up to $2,500 in a non-interest account where the funds will only be used for burial.

That is pretty much all you are allowed besides your home. Yet DO check with a lawyer who specialized in Elder Law. They are invaluable in helping you accommodate all income so that there is legibility. It is truly worth their fee.

PS: Mom also had savings and the Elder Lawyer created a Service Contract Agreement which allowed Mom to legally pass me the funds as payment for being her health surrogate...No, this does not mean I am taking care of her 24/7, but I make sure that she is being looked after well by a facility or a person.

Again, Elder Lawyer will be of incredible help!
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Yes. In fact, they only allow you to have up to about $1500 without cutting you off where as Social Security says you can have $2000, so I personally would go with the $2000 since there's a lot you may need that Medicaid doesn't cover anyway.

New changes with able act
Now that we have the new able act, you're now allowed to be able to save much more than you could before and here's why:

Some people who need big ticket items can't otherwise get them due to the past restrictions upon them. Unless you had someone helping you financially to get those big ticket items such as a car for starters, you could not otherwise get those items without some form of outside financial help. If you have no one to help you get those items that you absolutely need, you're screwed because you're stuck doing without big ticket items you absolutely need. That's because those big ticket items you absolutely need whether it be a car, a new home, or even life-saving medications that Medicaid won't cover. Lawmakers finally at long last saw the big widespread problem and the effects it was having in different areas. The problem was so bad that someone finally had to do something about it, and the new able act provided special savings account just for people with disabilities who happen to get Social Security. If you get Social Security, you can have an able account. They have much higher limits and you can actually save for you can have an able account. They have much higher limits and you can actually save for big ticket items you absolutely need that you otherwise can't get any other way without outside help.

Imagine you rent but something happens and you may absolutely need to move to a new and better place, but you don't have the money required for not just the deposit, but however many months rent that may be required of you in order to get the key and move in. Let's say you must move and under these conditions you have nowhere to go. You would end up in the streets if you couldn't get into a homeless shelter and worse yet, let's say you don't have rental assistance to help you transition. Yes, things like this happen more than you may think, which is why I'm very thankful for the able act since I found out about it and it became law. I think these may be the "savings accounts" President Trump spoke of when he was elected.

Here's another scenario:
Let's say you're single, disabled, no family, and have no outside financial help to help you get a well needed car. No car means you're pretty much homebound or stuck close to home if you depend on a power chair or mobility scooter due to some form of physical limits that requires you to have one. Without someone to take you somewhere, you can't even leave town without some form of transportation. Cabs are expensive no matter how you look at it. Something people out there in this kind of situation experience depression, I know one of them personally. I don't think most people would be able to live in such a situation and actually not go crazy after a while or suffer some form of depression from not being able to go nowhere or do nothing. I just don't think most people couldn't get her very long if they were to just hang up the keys for a week and see what it's like for some people. People take their transportation for granted and very often not even care about people who may need transportation but don't have it. There are charity programs out there for needy people who qualify for a little bit of help getting a car but the sad thing is many of those programs are inaccessible. You can sign up for a donated car through a charity website, but there's no guarantee someone in your area will donate a car. When you do, you're stuck with the responsibility of going to pick it up but getting there is a challenge for some people in certain situations. The way the banks and dealerships are set up prevents certain groups of people in certain situations to ever even get a car. This is why things really need to start changing because now you have a better idea of why dealerships have unsold inventory they must often either sell off at the end of the year or send back to wherever they got it from. It's said that unsold inventory is very often destroyed somewhere, and this is an even bigger problem when there are people out there with drivers license is who really do need those cars. This is why we must first start by talking to our local officials and work our way up to the state, regional and finally our national officials because this is a very widespread problem where people who most need cars can't get them. This is why I'm glad someone did something to give people on Social Security a better opportunity at a better life experience by making the able act law.

Here's another scenario as to why I'm glad for the able act:
We all know about life-saving medications such as inhalers, antirejection meds, diabetic medications, EpiPen's, etc. Let's say you absolutely need these medications but let's say you go to fill the prescription and medicaid won't cover it. I found out a little known secret. They usually want you to try all the cheaper medications first starting with the cheapest and working your way up before they'll cover the one you really need. This is where the savings when you're able account comes in handy.

Since the able act became law allowing for people to open and save in able accounts, I don't know if Medicaid counts these special types of accounts that are protected by law for legitimate reasons. I know they do count your check and regular accounts but I don't yet know much about the able accounts other than if something happens to you, Medicaid must be repaid from whatever is left over in your account if you die. I do know that you can use what's in your able account for final expenses as well as other qualified expenses. I also know there's about a 10% tax if you use your able account funds for anything outside of a qualified expense
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Why do you feel the gov. Is screwing your parents? My aunt had to go on Medicade and it cost the gov. Almost $500,000.00. I used all of her assets frugally to help care for as long as possible. I appreciate everything Medicade did for her. In the end it's all of us that contribute to the Care of the elderly.
Helpful Answer (7)
Report

Yes, our parents worked all their lives just for the government to screw them in the end when they need help the most. ( sorry to sound so harsh.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

There's a difference between income and assets. An asset may produce income, like shares of stock may produce dividends, or mineral rights may produce royalties etc. There are limits on both income and assets to qualify for Medicaid. And yes, Social Security payments are income that is counted.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

As part of the process of applying for Medicaid for my mom, Medicaid made me get with the V.A., since my dad had been in the service for a few years back in the 1950s. I had to search for dad's paperwork, and he's been dead since 2003; luckily, my brother had kept a folder. So if your dad was in the service...
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions