Are seizures common symptoms of Alzheimer’s?

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My mom had no hx of seizures, was in mild stage Alz. 2 major seizures later she was unconcious for 2 days and woke up in moderate stage. Got some memory back but home functioning was hit bad. She can't dial phone, left burner on etc. I was a medical professional and I understand the pathology, but as a daughter, I have lost about 6 months or more of my mild stage mother! I am so sad for this. If your alzheimer person has had seizures, could you please describe what happened, especially if you have seen it from beginning to end. Thank you, Karen

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I'm so sorry for you! You really have missed a special time with your mom. My dad was sent into instant dementia by a failed surgery, so I have a little feel for your situation. It just hits you in the gut - and heart.

I haven't seen the seizure problem with Alzheimer's, bu I'm kicking your question to the top of the list so if anyone else has experienced seizures with Alzheimer's, they can respond.
Take care of yourself,
Carol
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My mom had several convulsive seizures 2 weeks after we increased the dose of Aricept from 5 mg to 10mg. The side effects of some of the drugs treating Alhziemers drugs are seizures, among other things. So, I attribute her seizures to the aricept from 5mg to 10mg. This episode prompted hospitalization, breathing tube, (they had to sedate her so much to stop the seizures) but then in two days, she breathed on her own. She was placed on dilantin (a seizure medicine) and when she came home, I brought her to a neurologist who felt more comfortable with using Lamictal as an antiseizure medicine. We slowly increased her dose of the Lamiictal, lowered the dose of aricept back to 5mg. and she has not had a seizure since. We have also increased her dose of aricept after acheiving a therapeutiic lblood level of Lamictal in her body to protect her. So, in summary, get your mom to a neurologist. She must be on medication for seizures. Look at all the side effects of the drugs that she is taking and see if seizures are a side effect. You won't know what really caused the seizures. There is an increased risk of seizures with Alzheimers for sure according to the doc. But, with the right meds, she shouldn't have another.. In the meantime, do what you can with health aids, family, etc, to help her to move her body, identify objects, etc, read. She perhaps can recover some faculties that were injured that is unrelated to Alzheimers, but caused by seizures. Also, if you feel she is not benefiting from any Alzheimers drugs(like Excelon, Aricept, Namenda), gradually get her off the drugs with the help of your doc and decrease her risk of seizures that way. I send my blessings .
-Helen
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are seizures related as common pathology to developing alzheimers. I know it raises the risks for early dementia and my husband has had seizures for a long time but he has recent bad reaction to his dilantin but his neuro won't prescribe new meds until his eeg. He also had a stroke in '09 that left him hemiplegiac. He doesn't have ALS but he has fluid on the lungs with possible granuloma which they can't do surgery for to excised for biopsy. He also has osteo arthritis and heart decorcation of some kind. He would of had the surgery if his weight loss wasn't so dramatic. I feel as tho nothing locked down and permanently diagnosed correctly. I have caregiver help and getting paid to look after him. If anyone can give me more info on Alzheimers linked with some of the symptoms that I have mention would appreciate the info.
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I just experienced this with my mother this past sunday. We were sitting on the porch talking and she had what the doctor told us was a partial seizure. The neurologist said that people with alzheimer's are at a higher risk of seizure. All the tests were done and she was then started on Depakote. I have brought her back home, but you can tell she has more memory deficit. It is hard to watch this, thinking it can't get much worse. I know the progression goes on and now I am scouring the internet trying to learn as much as possible. Your story showed me that I am not alone. Denise 9-20-2012
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My mother has been in nursing care for 9 years and is in the late stages of Alzheimers & just this week was hospitalized due to seizures. Tests show her brain is condusive of the stage she is in, but she also failed the the swallow test. What does this mean and does this indicate she is in her last days?
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It is very important for folks with Alzheimers disease to see a neurologist, because they can have seizures. The brain is basically atrophing, and so it is possible. I am so sorry this is happening, please take care and know you are in our thoughts.
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Thanks everyone for being so helpful. We do have her on Lamictal and seems to be doing well. Karen
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My mother just had a second seizure, I'm not sure of the seizure medication. What stage of alzheimers can she be in?
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Oh please believe me I do understand that... I was not trying to sound at all critical of that! Perhaps if you call the neurologist who saw her they would be willing to do something just as a palliative or comfort measure. I do think that we have to accept the inevitable... I have cared for my Grandparents and my Father and I know you want her to be comfortable. take care, Jaye
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I did take her to a neurologist. They did an EKG while she was sitting up. She fell asleeps and started snoring. The snoring/Apnea caused spikes on the read out as I watched it. The tech did not point this out to the Dr. who read the snore/gasps spikes as abnormal. I had to explain the details.They did suggest Keppra as a means to stave off the seizures. They also wanted to do a 24 hour study under my supervision from my home..near impossible with most dementia/Alzheimer's patients to keep thier hands from fidgeting and pulling off whatever is attached to thier bodies..when I pointed this out, it was dropped. Beyond loading her up with meds at this point or extreme surgery I fail to see the benefits of a nuero at this stage in her illness beyond her becoming a documented guinea pig for others in the future. Organ failure is almost certain towards the end stages..what then? At what point do you suggest I stand back, come to terms with our mortality and let nature take its course? Artificial life-support?..Not happening here. Thanks for the advice, Jaye, but please understand that the right to die with dignity is a legitimate concept.
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