Does anyone have to approve our home for safety, etc if we move an elderly parent in?

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Actually there is a page on here on how to keep your home safe for an elderly just try the search engine!
with my mum we had an occupational therapist come and got a few things free like rails and toilet sit raisers. Rugs i think are the biggest problem for falls so get rid of all rugs also the bathroom is the most dangerous so rails around the bath/shower i think you can request an OT to visit your home and let you know whats needed!
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Does the elderly parent who will be moving in have dementia? If so, I would get help on things to do to make the house safer. There are so many things that you just don't realize are unsafe with a dementia patient around.

I would restrict their access to knives, scissors, electrical appliances, heat/air thermostats, medications, bug sprays, cleaners, etc. They can forget how these items are used and harm themselves with them. They can manage to locate things that you never thought they would and hide things in places you would never think to look.

I would be careful of any kind of rugs on the floor and bed rails are considered very dangerous to the elderly.

Hand rails in the bathroom should be considered as well as rails to help them enter and exit the house. Does the patient still walk or are they in a wheelchair? If they are leaving a rehab facility, someone there could help you with a list or walk thru to help you make sure everything is safe.
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If you are taking this person to live with you from the hospital, they will probably prescribe home healthcare for a period of time. In the process of visiting your home, the occupational and physical therapist will make recommendations. If they really think your home is unsafe from a cleanliness or organizational standpoint, expect them to recommend different placement and take the appropriate steps.

For instance, I doubt, if one lived in a hoarder house, home healthcare would allow the placement to continue.
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