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My apt. complex requires pet permission letter from a doctor or counselor for rental renewal. I've had two cats for 4 yrs.,One cat is my son's,his doctor wrote him a letter,but he no longer lives here. I have very serious Diabetes, and diabetes neurapathy[beyond surgery.The cats are helpful in keeping me active playing, feeding an daily brushing them.My PCP will not write a letter.She says cats are not assistive animals. I believe they are assistive in a companionship way.

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My friend has a therapy parrot (for ptsd). Any animal can be a legal service animal. It sounds like you need a new doctor.

Angel
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countrmouse, great idea to write a sample letter. CKlynn, make sure you are as specific as possible. Your landlord will want to know HOW your cats help you, not just THAT they help you.
also a quick clarification for your clueless PCP. He is thinking of an "service" dog, which are available for people who are blind, hard of hearing, epileptic and yes, diabetics. in the last two, the dog can sense an upcoming seizure or change in blood sugar and do something like nudge you to get your attention so you can take medicine to offset a seizure or spike in blood pressure. Therapy dogs (think "emotional" therapy) offer just that. We visit a local hospital: the staff likes her as much as the patients. She offers a bit of distraction for people who are in pain or anxious. Therapy dogs are now being given to soldiers with PTSD and are also used in universities for students to help with end of semester anxiety. But, she probably would not be allowed on public transportation, as a service dog would. I love all these suggestions. Please let us know how this t urns out.
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Your PCP is either an idiot or not paying attention. She's probably thinking only in terms of guide dogs, and needs to exercise a little more imagination. Try this:

Dear Doctor [name]

Further to my earlier request, please reconsider the following points.

My cats have been my companions for four years. Caring for them - feeding, grooming, hygiene - requires me to carry out daily physical tasks that help maintain my mobility and activity levels. In addition, I benefit mentally and emotionally from their continuous presence.

I hope that you will agree that in all of these ways these cats are of significant therapeutic value to someone who, because of severe diabetes and diabetic neuropathy, is unable to access alternatives; and that you will be prepared to write to that effect in support of my rental renewal application.

Thanking you in anticipation, yours sincerely, [signature].

If that doesn't work, find a new doctor - one who doesn't overlook the misery she'd cause to her patient by refusing a small request to help her keep her pets. What a cow!
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I just wrote this to another blogger... don't quite understand how to get text into the various AC-headings so it can be read by all... so here we go again....
Any doctor who has not heard of the benefits pets can bring to patients, is a Doc I would not keep !!!
I would suspect her of not updating her knowledge base as Docs are supposed to do, would wonder if I am getting good care there...
So sorry you are in this pickle, it is putting stress on you now, as long as all is so uncertain,,, not good for you B/P !!! Were it my pickle, I would change docs... would write down all the reasons why loosing my pets would hurt me...
Docs now-a-days like it when patients come in prepared with a list... It allows them to come to the point faster... and allows you to make sure all points are covered.
Docs can only write orders or scripts for their own patients, not some friend of a friend. They have to document everything they do in the patient's chart..
and I feel sure that such a small chore as to write a short note on a script pad verifying that loosing your cats would have unhealthy consequences, can't take very long. Docs, don't write letters anymore, if they can help it... But if you convince the doc, a short note will be all he needs to write on a script and that should be sufficient for your Apt.Manager.
Cats, or dogs, or parakeets... they are pets, you love them, getting upset over loosing them can't be good for your health... It would change your activity level, that's detrimental to health. I am shaking my head over the reaction you received...
Your Doc must be thinking of therapy dogs... that a patient only sees for a few minutes, when in a NSG. home... that is pleasing for a few minutes... Your present PCP should realize that any pet that is with you 24/7 creates a much bigger bond, that combats loneliness, which has been proven to be very detrimental to the health of the elderly. My cousin in Germany was in a NSG. home that actually had a stable of rabbits, chickens, cats, dogs... which the occupants took care of as much as they could. It gave them a reason to get up + moving and involved and happy which without a doubt had health benefits... America, get with it !! I Wish you Luck and success!!
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Does it specify what type of doc has to write the letter? I would try the vet who could explain the benefits of a cat. Or what about a therapist?
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hello. I have a therapy dog. More types of animals are being used for service and therapy work. I believe there is a cat residing at one of the hospices in our area. If the doctor is willing to write you a letter, make sure he knows all the benefits those cats bring to your life. Some suggestions: the cats keep you active as you mentioned, they provide company since your son doesn't live with you, caring for them gives you cognitive focus as you have to remember to feed them and empty the litter box, they reduce anxiety, etc. You can "tweak" these suggestions to fit your lifestyle, symptoms etc. If an endocrinologist treats your diabetes, he/she may be a better bet to write the letter since he/she is a specialist. Hope this helps you!
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Go to the doctor your son had and ask him to write a letter for you.
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