Has anyone used a home monitoring device to check on their loved one and their caregivers?

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If so, what recording devices have worked for you?

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Blessings4Ever: Yes, we do...do the best we can. Thank goodness for that snoopy neighbor. I am so sorry to hear of your brother's Alzheimer's. It is truly a horrific disease. Yes, God bless all caregivers.
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Llamalover 47 & others who care, lets remember we do the best we can, with what works at any given time. My brother was 1000 miles away, no response to my calls or letters, thought he was mad at me again. No idea early stage ALZ was at work. Luckily a "snoopy neighbor" found my # and reached out to me. God Bless her. At the beginning stage of ALZ he was struggling, clueless on how to use his phone. Most of our loved ones, well or not, are on a mission to retain their self & independence. If we are lucky we get clues to figure out. A caregiver's journey begins! God Bless Caregivers, 💐 To All
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I used the telephone and called my late mother from out of state several times daily. That was my well-being check.
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Good point faeriefiles. I agree, tell any hired help that there are cameras or adult monitors, even point them out. If they are performing their work for the right reasons, care & dedication, they shouldn't be concerned. A camera or adult monitor is a big help for me, the 24/7 person these days. It's not just for hired help. It's a way to keep an eye on things at any given time. I've found with any help it's hard to get "perfect" whether private or from agencies. I don't sweat the small stuff, but have noticed it; bottles of water missing, going thru juices faster, a donut for my brother/2 for me attitude. It would be appreciated if any needs were asked or mentioned. It aids in trust issues. I am more concerned with someone on their phone, texting, listening to music, not giving 100% to their responsibilities. If someone needs assistance with a.m. care, help. If guiding & direction work, do so with kindness. It's ok with letting someone with a memory impairment, such as ALZ, do as much as they can for as long as they can. The unattention is a big problem for me, especially with showering, it's an accident waiting to happen, even with bathroom precautions installed. All I hope for is that hired help use their own judgement, what works best for them to help my brother, yet, care for him with dignity & respect. I want an open door policy, I want to be confident in them, their experience & knowledge. Keep everything legal, what your comfort zone is. Don't fret, most have security systems these days.🌸
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What if you set up the system and tell the people and/or put a sign on the door announcing the video and or audio surveillance? Seems that if they know they are being recorded your chances immediately increase that they will behave better?
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I do have a camera that has a view of the kitchen/living room area of my parents apartment and I monitor caregivers and my parents when they are alone. Its been a lifesaver for me and have been shocked at the behaviors of some of the caregivers.. which I would have had no idea about without the camera. The agency knows it is there and it isn't hidden.

I found the below about nanny cams:
What Nanny Cam Laws Should I Know?
It can be difficult to make the decision to purchase a camera, but if you choose to, it's important to know the legalities. Families can choose whether or not to tell their caregiver that they have a nanny cam. And there are two types of laws you need to be aware of: ones for video surveillance and ones for audio recordings.
•Video surveillance laws: It's legal to install a nanny cam in all 50 states, even if you choose to videotape your nanny without her consent. However, you can't tape her in private areas of your home, such as the bathroom or a live-in nanny's bedroom. If you do install a nanny cam, be sure to do so in common spaces, such as the kitchen or playroom.
•Speech laws: While you can videotape your nanny, several states have laws to protect against audio recordings. If you live in California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oregon, Pennsylvania or Washington, you must notify your nanny if you have a nanny cam that records both audio and video. Not only could you be prosecuted for violating this law, but any evidence of abuse or neglect found on the tape could be inadmissible during legal proceedings.
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We have a nest camera in the living room where my mom spends most of her time. It is not hidden but caregivers have not seemed to notice. It has been helpful to see what new aides are doing and how mom has reacted to them. It is also useful to see mom when she is alone and to know she is okay.
I didn't know there were laws about this.
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I would consult with an attorney regarding any device like that or a recording device, due to state and federal laws. 
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My situation was a parent living in my home, in his own living quarters. My adult daughter also lived with me. We had a health aid coming in daily to assist my parent, and suspected her of various things. We set up a baby monitor for my daughter to monitor him while I was at work, and my daughter was able to listen to it as she worked from home. Turned out the health aid was talking my parent into selling his home and financing her, as well as doing inappropriate massages, etc... Also was running down our family to him, very manipulative, devious behavior, slowly under mining his confidence in his family and turning it towards her. We also noticed small things missing from the house that you wouldn't typically think of, but you'd notice the laundry detergent sure ran out fast, what happened to the change I had sitting on my kitchen counter, things like that. She also made comments that I was spoiled because I own a home, and shortly after things in my home were showing up damaged, damaged kitchen counter top, dryer and washing machine broke down, she tried to talk me into tearing out a bathroom wall even. She was fired. Another one tried to talk my parent into money to move her mother from Colorado closer to her, she wanted money. Another dropped my parent on the floor and couldn't assist him to get him off the floor, another was smoking in my house when we requested no smoking. Baby monitors work well if you or another family member are home, but have to be in another part of the house. Also it is illegal to record video etc... people in the home, unless it is a viable security system through out your home that is video and audio. Good luck.
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