Has anyone taken someone with dementia to the eye doctor?

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Reading has always been my mothers first love. I can't remeber a time in her life when mom didn't have a book going. Mom would read up to three books a week - everything from serious political or religious books to biographys to best seller crime novels. In the last couple of months mom has stopped reading - barely glances at magazines. When I talked to mom about it last week she said she couldn't see well enough to read anymore. I'm not convinced this is the cause as she has lost intrest in just about everything save her cat! However, I'm willing to give it a shot and take her to the eye doctor. Has anyone taken someone with dementia to the eye doctor? Moms dementia is probably considered moderate these days. Since I took her to a Getiatric Psychiatrist in December and he did a complete medication overhaul, mom has been 100x easier to get along with and is usually pleasant and agreeable. Still I'm not sure she could manage the "which one is better? This one or this one, this one or this one"? That bit makes me crazy when I go to the eye doctor! So - worthwhile attempt or exercise in futility? Lastly, a large chain bookstores offers a wide variety of those larger magnified reading assisters - some with or without an attached light. Has anyone used one that is worthwhile? Mom would need something on the larger side that she didn't have to grip and move along like a typical magnifying glass.

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First, Medicare pays for all eye examines once a year. Doesn't pay for eye dialation, lenses or frames. Moms Dr. wants to see her once a year for any changes. This year a stroke is in question since she no longer sees from the side on her left eye. Tomorrow she goes for a light test to confirm the stroke. Since she doesn't take instruction well, not sure how this will go. She has to push a button when she sees a light.
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we got one for mom, too; very nice
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I took my grandma to the eye doctor just last month. She had catarats years ago so medicare pays for her eye exams once a year. I was really worried as she has a 3rd grade level of reading having dropped out of school at that age and has severe dementia. She was able to read the letters to the lady and did a fine job of it. I asked the lady what happens when people can't do letters. She smiled and said she had pediatric charts with shapes that might work well for them if they can remember those. She said that dementia patients often can handle the charts until much much later in the disease and then the eye charts aren't necessary as they are bed ridden by then.

I'm sure it will go well. My mom used a natural light that contained a magnifying glass that was held up for her. She used it for sewing. She got it as Joann fabrics. It worked wonderfully. Maybe that will help her.
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My father had his first cataract surgery after my mother died in 2004. When the lens was removed, the membrane ruptured and then healed - which they tell me sometimes happens - but he carried with him the idea that it wasn't successful; which wasn't true, his final eyesight was 20-40. Then the other eye developed a worse cataract significantly affecting his vision, which he blamed on the first surgery, so it took me (and the doc) 11 years to convince him to have the second surgery. 3 weeks of preparation with eye drops and every day he thought it was the day of surgery. Finally the day arrived, we showed up at 8:30 am as scheduled, doc came out to greet him before surgery, surgery successful and when I went to see him, he didn't really understand why he was there. Had 4 teeth filled the other day and didn't know it either.
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Joann, why was asking; my mom had both done as well - so I do know the difference - why did your bil have to have a cornea transplant?
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My nephew was fitted for glasses at 8 months. I asked how they could determine he needed them when he couldn't do the test. I was told its the way light refracs off the eye. Once he put on those glasses he never took them off.
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Debdaughter, my BIL justhad both done. Cornia transplant and cateracts. Cateracts is making a slit taking out the old lens and putting in a new contact type lens. Cornia transplant is just that, a new cornia replaces the old one.
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Yes, I know exactly how hard it is to cope with, my gram was having a more difficult time reading and I went round and round with the eye doctors being as she has macular degeneration and glaucoma, but was also diagnosed with Alzheimer's with mild dementia. Unfortunately it wasn't her eyes but her ability to understand the written word. My sympathy, I couldn't possibly describe the challenge it is to care for someone with those conditions. Consider medications for the Alzheimer's, in my experience it does help. I won't say it can reverse any damage done but it does slow it.
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LKB, you said both cataract and cornea implants...did she have both?
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I have. My late Mother's retinologist funneled $800,000.00 into a "faux" fund, but she didn't care because she liked to socialize with him at appointments even though he was a felon!
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