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Sorry, but you cant keep a" nest egg" and expect the public to pick up the tab.
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Jennifer you will never be able to supplement your lost wages. Here are some things to think about if one is trying to decide whether to quit work to care for an aging parent.... on average if a working person quits work he/she will lose over the years between $285,000 and $325,000 which includes not only loss of salary... it also includes the net worth loss of the health insurance coverage.... loss of money being put into Social Security/Medicare..... loss of other benefits such as matching 401(k).... profit sharing.... workman's comp insurance.... company sponsored life insurance.... vacation pay, sick pay.... tuition assistance, etc. [source: in part Reuters 5/30/12]
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We live in Wisconsin. I have taken FMLA to take care of her for now and unfortunately with her condition, having a brain tumor and getting chemo, she has too many appointments and care needs for me to manage working full time and her needs for now. I wanted to see if there was a way to be paid by the state, even at min. wage to help me supplement my lost wages. My mom does have some money in savings but I wanted to not use that at all, so that when she is better she still has her nest egg. She would pay a caregiver outside of the time that i am there, but she has yet to offer any type of payment to me. I had hoped that the state would help, but it sounds like they would see her savings and view her situation as not one they would help with?
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My sister got paid for taking care of our mother. My disabled brother got paid for doing her housekeeping. In our case we went through the county human services department and got her on Medicaid.

Our mother lived with my sister for 14 months. She was assessed by her caseworker and found to be eligible for in-home care x hours a weeks. My sister had the choice of taking that pay herself or having a worker come into the home to give her some respite. Sis took care of Mom 24/7, but got paid for x hours Mom was eligible for.

The first question is, is your mother eligible for any programs that would pay for some amount of in-home care? Then the next question is does that program pay family members to provide that care.

Starting with human services was very effective for us. When the assessment caseworker comes out for an interview, be sure that you are there! Elders are notorious for saying, "Yes I can make my own lunch" when they haven't done that for a year!
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Jennifer, majority of grown children do not get paid unless their parent can pay the caregiver from their own retirement fund. If a parent can pay, then it would make more sense to hire a private caregiver so that you can continue to work to build up your own retirement fund.

Otherwise some States have what is called "Cash and Counseling" which is funded different ways.... one way is through Medicaid, but your parent would need to apply and qualify for Medicaid. If not through Medicaid, then there are different rules to qualify.

If you do get paid, you won't be paid for being a 24-hour caregiver, more likely less than part-time, at minimum wage.
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All states are different, but most have Medicaid Waiver programs that can pay caregivers. What state are you in?
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