Anyone know anything about a Supra Pelvic tube to urinate?

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My father went to his urologist today and complained about peeing through his Depends or dropping his urinal and this is what the doctor suggested that he get. I have never heard about it and looked it up on the internet. All the urine is collected in a bag. My dad was all for it and agreed to set it up before my brother came back in the room and said we needed to discuss this more. I understand this is done with general anesthesia, and I have learned on this website how debilitating that can be on the elderly. My father had two massive strokes 23 years ago, almost completely recovered for several years but has been in a wheelchair for the last 14 years. He is incontinent both ways and has to be lifted with a Hoyer sling into bed in order to be cleaned, but we are all trained in how to use it. He sometimes can use a urinal but most of the time doesn’t even know when he needs to pee. He is 87, with few ADLs and dementia though he can converse and be lucid at times. We have run into this before with his cardiologist telling him he needed a pacemaker about 6 years ago. He didn’t get it and surprisingly enough all his subsequent heart visits have been excellent. Did his heart heal itself? My father has excellent medical insurance in addition to Medicare. I think my dad is easily led by his doctors and I get the idea that he thinks this will solve all his leaking problems, but he is still bowel incontinent! Any thoughts?

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Thank you for all of your responses. I have learned a lot more about this procedure here than reading up on it on the internet. My father and siblings have decided not to have the procedure. This might be something we will consider if he starts having issues with skin, etc. His skin is in great shape. The only issue he has had with skin are some small skin cancers which were removed from his face years ago. My father was raised in south Texas and was a cowboy for several summers on a ranch where he herded cattle. Everywhere where his skin was exposed looks like old man skin, the unexposed skin looks like the skin of a man half his age. It really shows how damaging and aging sun exposure is on the skin. Thank you again for all your responses. The members on this site are so kind.
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Hi,
I'm an RN and my Dad has a suprapubic catheter due to an enlarged prostate. They are placed in a short procedure under general anesthesia. Your father's primary doctor would have to evaluate him for fitness under general anesthesia. As far as upkeep, etc., it may be a good solution for your Dad since he has to be lifted to be changed. It would be less friction overall on his skin, plus less skin breakdown from wet underpants, etc. The stoma or opening is rather small, and is covered with gauze. Self care means changing the gauze daily, and regular urology visits to check the catheter. The urine collects in a bag that can be hung on his wheelchair, or they have leg bags that will fit under clothing if your Dad would prefer that. They are MUCH easier to take care of and much less likely to start an infection as opposed to one that comes out of the penis. Have a urologist explain the procedure to you. I would feel comfortable saying you should check it out, but a lot will depend on how your Dad would tolerated surgery.
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My dad is 87 and sees a urologist regularly. He is very frequently incontinent with his bladder, uses some form of Depends that is ordered from Amazon (the name escapes me at the moment) His urologist has told him for several years now that none of the available options that use any form of surgery are advisable for someone his age, both due to age, his other medical issues, and mostly because they wouldn’t work that well. We’ve always appreciated the honesty.
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My dad has no pain when he urinates and all organs are working fine. He is just incontinent and unable to care for himself. I expect the doctor suggested this for the convenience of his caregivers or maybe for him if he would like the tube instead of a wet diaper. I told him, actually we all told him, that we would much rather change his Depends or clean up a mess on his bedding or floor than for him to undergo this procedure and have a tube sticking out of him. 
Thank you for the suggestion about the Abena diaper. My brother who handles finances, buys Depends in bulk from Sams. We just never questioned whether they were the best or not. As to extra cost, we have been putting two Depends on him at night. Maybe with the Abena diaper he’ll need just one at night.
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I'd consider another MD for at least a 2nd opinion. One should never enter into a surgical procedure, especially with anesthesia, let alone with dementia, unless a life-threatening situation imo. Have to weigh the risks vs benefits. He is still, it sounds, going to need help due to his other incontinence. One must become a strong advocate for our family members, all while also respecting their ability to make decisions for themselves, competently. Also suggest you check out HDIS which can ship supplies to your home and has all varieties...
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LindaD I wonder if maybe your dad was describing discomfort (from being wet or feeling the cath) with pain, I know my mom often uses the term "pain" when it isn't really pain per se she is experiencing, in fact her pain tolerance and or complaint threshold is so high we aren't learning about problems until they have advanced far beyond necessary. That said of course a regular catheter particularly in a male I believe, can often cause discomfort, pain because of the way it rubs depending on how active they are. Just thinking about it doesn't sound comfortable. This is all exactly why having people who know and care about you as you age, who can speak up for you and your best interest makes such a difference. Each individual case and point in time is different just as individuals are so having several choices to balance the pros and cons with is a blessing as much as a PIA! ;) Good luck with this Treeartist, your dad is very fortunate to have you watching out for him and whether or not he is able to verbalize that often he knows it.
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My dad suffered with a swollen prostrate and at times were attached to a catheter. He had bowel leaks and had to wear diapers most time at 86yrs. It is tough and the doctors sis not suggest anything else. He was on Cardigen Meds for the prostrate, which helped a lot.
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My uncle had it done because he was in such pain with the catheter. He was 89. He also had dementia. I’m not sure what it did for him but the nursing home said he was in less pain after it was done. So my question to you is: is your father in pain when he urinates?
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Tree artist,
Nowadays, everyone wants a "quick fix". Doctors are going along with the trend. They give you the options, you choose.

Believe it or not, there are people opting for a SP cath without many physical problems, just for "convenience".

That's why we have gazillions of medications out there too. Sign of the times.
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The first thing that I would do is to upgrade his Depends to disposable underwear with greater capacity. Check out Abena Abri-Flex. They're more expensive, but will hold 3x the amount of fluid.
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