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Visiting physician confirmed my suspicions yesterday and told us hubby is still in Congestive Heart Failure. I had a DASH diet cookbook (someplace) but even though my husband isn’t a fussy eater, I have to feed him more than salads, grilled chicken, fish and turkey burgers. Any cookbooks you really like? Thanks!

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Omit salt in the foods that you make and season with other spices to heighten flavors.
Things like lemon juice and vinegar also hit the same taste buds that salt does so it can have the same flavor impact.
Some of the no salt seasoning blends are great and one will work for any number of dishes.
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Reply to Grandma1954
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Cooking with just a little bit of salt or without salt is a lot easier than you think. I love SPIKE. You can find it at your grocery store. It adds so much flavor to everything.

Mustard is highly underrated and underused for adding depth and flavor to all sorts of dishes. You also can add wine because the alcohol will cook off.

Lemon juice is another great ingredient for adding freshness and wakening up the taste buds.

I also use a lot of smoked paprika especially with eggs and roasted vegetables.

Cumin is great for making turkey or lean beef chili. Add in dark red kidney beans and, just before serving the chili, add some minced raw onion or scallions for some freshness.

I cook a lot in my crockpot. Brown the meat before adding it to the crock because it will add a lot of flavor.

Tomato paste is another great hack for dialing up flavor. And there are brands that carry a "No Salt Added" variety.

Finally, because your hubby is a "sandwich guy" - and I know because mine is too - make your own sandwich meats! It's super easy and much, much cheaper than buying processed luncheon meats at the deli counter. Here are two of my favorite recipes:

For turkey: Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Place the turkey breast on a rack in a roasting pan, skin side up. In a small bowl, combine the olive oil, garlic, lemon juice, mustard, rosemary, sage, thyme, SPIKE, and pepper. Rub the mixture evenly all over the skin of the turkey breast.

For roastbeef: Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Mix rosemary, thyme, SPIKE, pepper and garlic in a small bowl. Rub the mixture all over the beef roast, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate, about 20 minutes. Heat oil in a large heavy skillet over high heat and add the roast to the pan. Sear the roast on all sides, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Transfer the roast to a roasting pan with a rack. Roast until a thermometer inserted into the center registers 125 degrees F, about 50 minutes. Transfer the roast to a cutting board and let rest, about 15 minutes. Thinly slice the roast and serve. 

I could go on and on because I L-O-V-E to cook. Don't be daunted by having to cook without a lot of salt. Ask his doctor how many milligrams of salt he can have per day and measure out your salt. You can also buy pre-measured salt packets to keep it simple. The body does need salt so don't go to extremes! Good luck.
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Reply to NYDaughterInLaw
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Ahmijoy Oct 26, 2018
Thanks! Great information!!!
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If there is a Trader Joe's near you, they carry a no sodium Marinara sauce. I saute veggies and add them to the sauce...simmer and add herb seasonings and pepper. it is g reat over meatloaf, and pasta.
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Reply to Enshope
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I buy a product on Amazon (since I can't find it in my local stores) called Massel All Purpose Bouillon & Seasoning (in the cans)... it comes in chicken, beef, and vegetable flavor. It's totally vegan (even the chicken and beef flavors) but what I like about it is the sodium content, a mere 7% for a full *1/2 CUP* serving of the chicken or beef flavor (8% for veg). Most bouillons are 30% or higher for just one cube. Cost is $16 for six 4.2 oz. cans of the chicken. MSG/Cholesterol/Gluten/Transfat/Sugar/Lactose free.

It's not only delicious as broth to drink, but can be used for sauteing meats and vegetables, giving them enough of a salty taste to satisfy without overdoing it. Massel actually advertises doing that on the product label.

Thought it might be helpful during the transition from salt to no salt diet. And as so many other helpful readers have suggested, avoid processed and prepared foods.
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Reply to TekkieChikk
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You can check out Mayo Clinic. I think they have quite a collection of low fat and low sodium recipes there.
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Reply to Katz17
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When I learned to cook, my grandfather lived with us. He salted everything and so I learned to cook without salt. Just don't add salt. You do get used to the taste. I say that, but I can't eat onions or garlic and so I still salt my eggs. We look at labels when we purchase canned or frozen food. Usually we cook fresh vegetables.
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Reply to MaryKathleen
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The chair goes out...but not back in. That's interesting...would it help to go in backwards, ie pulling it in rather than pushing forward? I'm guessing you've tried it all. I know this is wild...but since you go out so rarely...I wonder if the local police or fire guys (call on the non-emergency number of course) might be able to give you an assist. Do you have a local office on aging? I wonder if they might have a grant program or something to help widen your doorway and get a more accommodating wheel chair...
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Ahmijoy Oct 15, 2018
Thanks, G. Good advice. Other than the fact that when the screen door is open, it opens out and may sort of give the illusion that the door is narrower. It may throw my husband off. This is a power chair that he has to control with a joystick. Since he has mobility issues, he tends to “oversteer”. The most difficult part is getting him back up the ramp. It is too steep and the wheels of the chair tend to spin and slide. He freaks out. The equipment salesman came back out to look at it, but he was young, agile and weighs half of what my husband weighs. Of COURSE he had no problem maneuvering it! We have a regular chair too, but there is no way possible for me to push that one up the ramp.

I have the the utmost respect and admiration for our first responders. However, the last time I called for help, the fire captain came with them and he was, um, not very nice. He let me know that this was not a “medical emergency” since my husband just needed help getting up on his chair. I believe he even mentioned that we were taking his crew away from someone who had a “real emergency”. So, I hesitate to call them again.

Ive researched any help out there for us to have some minor home repairs done including the possibility of a wheelchair lift to replace the ramp. A nurse from a state run agency called “Direction Home” came out and spent over an hour with us, interviewing us to see if we qualified. She never followed up and subsequent emails I sent go unanswered. It’s frustrating to say the least!

But, thank you for your good advice. Just told hubs today I want to get him to his cardiologist and he refused. So, it’s a moot point. 😡
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Try these sites;
For recipes
Low-Sodium Diabetic Recipes - EatingWellwww.eatingwell.com › ... › Low-Sodium › Low-Sodium Diabetic Recipes

Cookbook
The Low Sodium Cookbook: Delicious, Simple, and Healthy Low-Salt ...https://www.amazon.com/Low-Sodium-Cookbook-Delicious-Low.../B00GXSY7TI
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Reply to SueC1957
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https://www.ucsfhealth.org/education/diet_and_congestive_heart_failure/
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Reply to Llamalover47
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I don't know why I thought he wasn't on diuretics, my bad brain mixing posts up I suppose.

I read somewhere that herbs are 10xs more nutritious than fruits and veggies, so I started using them in everything, parsley when it is dried kinda disappears flavor wise but still gives nutrition and kind of brightens flavors, like salt.

Another thing that we do alot is bake potatoes, cool or refrigerate (I make enough for several meals) and then I cut them in half, drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle pepper, dried shallots, onion powder and garlic powder, put cut side face down on bbq or toaster oven or cookie sheet in oven and cook until crispy. They go with any meat or any meal. I reheat on toast in the toaster oven.

When I took my dad to the dietitian she said to avoid processed foods and use a high quality salt, like Celtic sea salt or Himalayan salt they have loads of minerals, so not to avoid salt completely just use a shake at table not during prep.

Mustard is a really good meat marinade, a little goes a long way and tenderizes to boot.

Just been thinking about you and your question, I'll probably have more ideas.😁 I love to cook healthy.
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Reply to Isthisrealyreal
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Ahmijoy Oct 14, 2018
Thanks, Is!
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Fresh, frozen, and canned fruits are practically sodium free
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Isthisrealyreal Oct 14, 2018
Did you know that frozen fruits and vegetables have more nutritional value than fresh? Has to do with fresh food losing nutrients every day from harvest to consumption but freezing stops that lose.

Still can't beat some thing's fresh even if they aren't as nutritious.

Canned veggies can be very high in sodium so if you are using them be sure and check.
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You can flavor meat up with marinades ... some kind of acid like vinegar, citrus, or wine, then add herbs and garlic. Smoked paprika is really good on beef or pork.
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Reply to Linda22
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Have you been told to restrict his sodium? I ask because I restricted my DH's sodium and it was the wrong thing to do and he quit eating.

So, unless you have been advised to restrict the sodium, tread carefully.
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Reply to RayLinStephens
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Ahmijoy Oct 16, 2018
Yes, his physician said to restrict his sodium to 1500mgs a day and also to restrict his fluids. He has a large (32 oz) cup and I was filling that at least 3 times a day.
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If he is a sandwich eater, have you tried replacing one or both pieces of bread with lettuce leafs? We do this for burgers and sandwiches, crunchy and delicious without all of the processed food junk bread has.

Sometimes people with CHF need daily diuretics. Are his kidneys damaged and that is the reason for no daily diuretic?

He should qualify for a dietitian visit that will address all of his medical conditions, that would help you with cooking proper food.

You are blessed that he isn't picky, my dad has a list a mile long what he won't eat and how he wants what he will eat prepared, good luck, not at my table.
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Ahmijoy Oct 14, 2018
Oh, hubby is on diuretics, 80mg. of Furosemide daily. I like the lettuce leaf idea. Bread is a downfall of his. But I know I’m lucky he isn’t a fussy eater. Meat and potatoes!
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If you are near a heart hospital, they may have recipes.
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Reply to annandpaul1629
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My husband has congestive heart failure caused by Frontal Temporal Dementia. His cardiologist also recommended low sodium diet....less than 1500 mg. daily. No problem for our family. We have cooked organic foods (meats, vegetables, grains, fruits, etc. ) "from scratch" for many years. Have not had to change the diet much....just no canned fish or meats and no processed foods. We also have a bread making machine that we make all our bread with. In cooking recipes for him, I use American Heart recipes, leave out all sodium, then baking & cooking is fine. Adapt & adjust recipes, leaving out the sodium. After he came home from Nursing Home, this worked so well that he was able to totally eliminate the Lasix he had been on. Good luck....this is a lot of work. But it has been successful for us. Even his cardiologist told me at his last visit...."let him eat what he wants, he will not get much any amount of sodium the way you cook food." Read labels for sodium content on everything you purchase. Or....purchase plain raw foods & prepare at home. It has been successful for us. God bless!
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Ahmijoy Oct 14, 2018
Thanks! Great ideas!
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The only thing I can add to all this good advice is, watch the sugar. Many processed foods that are "low Sodium" have added sugar to make them taste better.
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Reply to MaryKathleen
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I've used "No Salt" (largely Potassium-based) for years, with my husband's cardialogist and cardio rehab nutritionist approval. Some people notice a slight difference in mouthfeel from Sodium. But for us and for my sister, that discrimination went away quickly. Even some pre-prepared foods (such as soups and frozen meals) are reducing sodium by substituting potassium salts. As for proportion, I find I often use equal measures, simply replacing the normal amount of table salt with No Salt .

If you have any potassium/sodium issues though, make sure to check with your doctor first.
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Reply to 50sChild
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If you go to Allrecipes.com, they have a good section devoted to low sodium.
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Reply to gibsonboy
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Check out the seasoning called MrsDash in the supermarket. One of my favorites is Garlic and Herb. They have other flavors as well to season different types of foods.
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Reply to Deniese
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Ami, the secret is not really adding salt while cooking, a pinch of salt doesn't hurt, it is the hidden salt. So, I just looked at my loaf of bread, each slice has 180 mg of sodium, 360 per sandwich. I have a Mediterranean store in town which sells wraps with only 10 mg of sodium, I took the bread away and did wraps instead. I threw out all canned vegetables and replaced with frozen or fresh. Exes parents used to shop at Aldi, one day we compared labels on basic things and the products there have alot more sodium per serving than the brand name things I bought for me. Alot of the struggle is actually watching labels and measuring out serving sizes rather than doing it by size.
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Ahmijoy Oct 14, 2018
What you say is very true. Reading the labels on canned foods the first time we went through this was a religious experience. When I saw the sodium content, I’d say, “Oh, my God!” I do shop at Aldi because the stuff is cheaper. I save $100 a month going there. But I am going to be super diligent from now on. Thanks for your advice!
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I don't know where you are, but wonder what transportation services might exist to help you get to the cardiologist...i.e. help your husband out to get there. Someone said diet alone won't resolve CHF, and it's true...it is a chronic condition, but I so get your wanting to do all you can. I worry about the flip side...not to overdo sodium...but you don't want to take a pleasure out of life-sustaining eating. And I know of at least one person who was very strict about sodium and wound up in the ER because she through her whole system out of wack with the electrolytes and such. I'm sure if you go to Amazon and put salt-free/sodium free in the search box you'll get some cookbook ideas; I think the Cleveland Clinic did a cookbook as well that was heart-healthy. If you have a Trader Joes near you, they used to maintain some lists related to particular diet needs. I used to have a client who was diabetic and he refused Meals on Wheels (also a potential option for you?, with a low sodium meal) and he bought a variety of Healthy Choice frozen meals.
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Ahmijoy Oct 14, 2018
Thanks, G. I’m using the net a lot for recipe ideas. Thank Heavens he’s not a fussy eater because i am far from a gourmet cook and/or dietician.

We do have the means to get him out. We have a Community Transport, we have a ramp and a power chair plus a Hoyer lift. However, when we come home, the chair slips and slides on the ramp and I have to push 300 pounds of him plus the chair up the ramp. This has happened twice. Then, it won’t fit back through the door. Last time it took us 35 minutes to get the chair through the door. Just not measured very well. But, it’s getting to the point I am going to make the cardio appointment for him and just handle it. I don’t think this Visiting Physician Agency is really doing all they can to help him.
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Thanks for your advice, everyone. Lunch is the hardest since he’s a “sandwich” guy. I just printed out 64 pages of the NIH and DASH Diet information. Going to Aldi’s tomorrow.
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Ener-G.com - makes sodium free baking powder and baking soda (both of the regular kinds have tons of sodium in them) You can substitute these in most any recipe and eat what you like. Packaged bread has loads of sodium - I make "simple bread rolls" - google search) No salt added. We use for rolls and for buns. Instaed of salt use garlic powder and onion powder - makes things taste like salt. If he likes vegetables - beans make a great meat substitute - use jalepeno pepper to season. By reading the labels for sodium content - I have found I can even give my Mom limited amounts of crackers, etc. Be sure to check the serving size (240 unit of sodium seems high until you see it is for 29 pieces)
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Reply to desert192
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Just "Google" salt free recipes and you will find more than you can imagine!
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Reply to Judysai422
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If I wanted to add lots of flavour without salt I'd turn to Indian cookery. The ingredients' list looks daunting to start with but once you get going it really isn't; and the commonest elements, like ginger, garlic and turmeric, are health heroes. You can't go wrong :)

Um. You know you're not going to reverse CHF through diet alone no matter how strict you are, yes?
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Ahmijoy Oct 14, 2018
Yes, CM, I know that and it’s very scary. Every time he coughs, I cringe and my heart falls. I’d like to see him go to the hospital like last time and be cathererized to drain all this excess fluid. They doubled his diuretics and I’ve cut his fluid consumption just about in half. But the cough is still there. If I could manage to get him out, I’d like to take him to his cardio. I’m doing all I can and praying very hard.
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I’m in the same situation here with you. I take care of my father that has Dementia, diabetic, kidney problems, alone with CHF.
It is very time consuming trying to fix low sodium meals. But it can be done. At the grocery store in the deli section they have a list if meats that are low sodium, roast beef and turkey only like 60gm
a new chips air pops has 119 gm but you can have 28 chips I make this for his lunch.
You have to cook things from scratch
beans are also good choice and you can add veggies to them too. I cook mainly with Mrs dash for added flavor.
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Reply to Chole18
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The mayo clinic website has recipes for low sodium diets. It is categorized and includes the number of milligrams per serving.
https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/recipes/low-sodium-recipes/rcs-20077197
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Reply to geewiz
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I cook same food as always but do not add salt. Use a Mrs Dash mixture with some pink salt added to it or some 50/50 lite salt. We keep it in a salt shaker. My mom is on low salt and as long as there's something flavorful she doesn't miss the bunch of added salt that she used to use.
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Judysai422 Oct 14, 2018
Before using a salt substitute, not Mrs. Dash, check with doctor as some cannot be used when some medical conditions exist.
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Does your husband complain about the monotony of his diet? If so, can you switch up the spices and serve sliced turkey with gravy, turkey tacos, turkey hash, fish/seafood chowder, grilled fish, fish fillets sautéed in a whole wheat crust, a non salt mayo based fish or meat salad with raw veggie dippers, whole grain or bean based pasta with red or white sauce and chicken?

If I’m eating food that I really enjoy, I don’t need or expect a lot of variety. If husband isn’t a fussy eater, you may be tired of cooking same/similar meals that he still enjoys.

There are some foods I miss (cheese-miss it a LOT) BUT I stopped eating salt for another health reasons, and I was surprised at how little I missed it.

I also use Mrs. Dash in a few of the different flavors available.
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