Any ideas of funeral songs for an elderly parent's service?

Follow
Share
109

Answers

Show:
Think about what kind of music your parents enjoyed, esp if they were religious.
I've sung at MANY funerals, and I have been kind of amazed at the variety of songs people wanted. "Whispering Hope"-sung at Grandma's, "How Great thou Art", " I Come to the Garden Alone", "what a Wonderful world"....everyone has different tastes.

If some of the family is musical, get them involved. My daughter has rehearsed a piano piece she played at daddy's funeral and will play at Mother's so much she's memorized it.

I personally have chosen non-religious songs for me own service, even tho I am deeply religious.

DH's choice is "I can't get No Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones. (sigh) go figure.

If you respect the person's wishes, you can't go wrong.
Helpful Answer (13)
Reply to Midkid58
Report

My BIL used to play Waltzing Matilda, and the whole family, down to the littlest kid, would sing loudly and joyfully. His memorial service included a beautiful, soft rendition played on violin by a friend. And it ended with us all singing the song. It was the family's way of celebrating his life.
Helpful Answer (12)
Reply to Linda22
Report

One of the most beautiful funerals I have attended had a Christmas theme. Christmas being the deceased’s favorite time.
She died in late Nov so it was almost seasonal.
The song that was so beautiful was her favorite. Silent Night, accompanied by a violin and sung by the attendees in a beautiful mausoleum.
Poinsettias and Norfolk pines, other favorites, were prominent. So, echoing what others have said. Make it personal to the deceased.
Helpful Answer (11)
Reply to 97yroldmom
Report

At many funeral's I have attended,the song "My Way" has been played and the other day at a funeral,I heard "Smile" and that was great. I really think songs that the Loved One lost would've loved are best to play or one's that relate to them or their life.
I'm sure the funeral director would suggest many also.Good luck & take care~
Helpful Answer (10)
Reply to luckylu
Report

So sorry for your loss. - Hugs

Queen - Don't stop me now.
Monty python - Always look on the bright side of life.
Whiting / Dykes - For Those in Peril on the Sea (Eternal Father, strong to save)

These are the ones I have selected for me. Hope you like one of them, but it all depends on your parents personal choice.
Helpful Answer (9)
Reply to BuzzyBee
Report

Abide with Me. How Great Thou Art. Amazing Grace is beautiful but it's become sort of a cliche and is usually sung too slowly.
Helpful Answer (7)
Reply to realtime
Report

Dear Mia,

I am very sorry for your loss. My deepest sympathies and condolences.

Choosing music is very personal. I know you want to respect your elderly parent's wishes as much as possible. So many wonderful songs about love and devotion. And even some classical music would be suitable.
Helpful Answer (7)
Reply to cdnreader
Report

What a coincidence - they were discussing this very subject on the radio this afternoon, kept my mind right off the terrible traffic...

Of course it very much depends on the nature of the funeral - whether it is religious or not, what wishes if any the person expressed.

A priest on the programme was explaining the problems he sometimes had with families not wanting funerals to be "too gloomy." They wanted it to be a celebration of the person, and of life, with music to match. Hence the enormous popularity of 'My Way' as a choice.

But, he pointed out, the point about death is that it is God's to ordain. Passing from life to death (and then, most religions hope and trust, onwards and upwards) is pretty much the polar opposite of individuality and choice. It is about the inexorability of God's will. And the message to mourners quite often is not so much "there there, he's with the angels" as how we had all better get used to the idea of our own death, and think on't.

On the practical side, what this minister suggested was that the family keep the Deceased's All-Time Favourites for the wake, and allow the funeral itself to be both more sober and more focused on the person's relationship with God, with hymns to match. Which seems a good and appropriate balance to me, anyway.

The other topic that came up and might be useful, was that of funeral singers. Bookings have shot up, apparently; and having a beautiful hymn or anthem well sung by a real person, rather than a recording, has been a great comfort to many mourners.
Helpful Answer (7)
Reply to Countrymouse
Report

Some religious denominations expect or require that the songs come from the approved hymnal. In that case, the secular songs are best kept for a wake or memorial, as several people have said. But even to the non-religious, many of the old hymns give comfort. When my DIL's ashes were buried next to her mother's in the old family cemetery, my son and his brother-in-law, with her closest friends, celebrated her life in an informal secular service. But at the end, her very old uncle unexpectedly took a harmonica out of his pocket and played "Amazing Grace." It was a sunny, quiet, country day and when the chords drifted out over the hill where she was buried we all wept. And it was perfect.
Helpful Answer (7)
Reply to realtime
Report

Oh realtime. Thanks for sharing that. So sweet.

Reminded me of another funeral. The WW II vet was being buried with military honors. 21 gun salute and taps. When everyone honored the flag by placing their right hand over their hearts, the elderly widow ( with Alzheimer’s and cancer) unexpectedly stood from her wheelchair and did the same. It brought tears to everyone’s eyes, especially the family who knew how ill she was. She died one month and one day later.
Helpful Answer (7)
Reply to 97yroldmom
Report

See All Answers
Related
Questions