Follow
Share

Does anyone have experience with a rolling clean shower/commode chair? We are doing a bath remodel for our dad and we like the option of putting him in a rolling chair that can roll right over the commode.


We are not crazy about using a bed pan for now. A chair like this would allow us to take care of him longer vs bringing in help on most days.


PS, LOVE this website!

Find Care & Housing
A wet room would be my dream bathroom! The bidet sprayers are a great idea, we were fortunate that our hand held shower hose was able to do double duty.
It is good you have found an experienced contractor, it might be worthwhile to seek out an occupational therapist as well who can evaluate your father's abilities and make recommendations. They might also be able to advise whether the specific equipment you are looking at is suitable or has any flaws that make it less user friendly.

If he is totally immobile you might want to consider whether you may need to use a lift, either a portable or a fixed ceiling one, and incorporate that into your plans.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to cwillie
Report

The contractor who put Moms shower in suggested no shower chair built into the wall. He had complaints that it was hard washing your back or someone doing it for you.

I had an aide come in to bath Mom. She told me I needed a bath mat in the shower. I told her that wouldn't work since the floor of the shower was patterned to be non-slip. A shower mat would not suction to it.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to JoAnn29
Report

Thank you all! I agree. Our contractor specializes in ADA compliant
homes and has some great ideas. We are converting small bath to
a wet room and he wants too put a shower hose adjacent to toilet.

We will convert adjacent bedroom from carpet to vinyl flooring. Shower/commode chairs made with PVC look cumbersome, uncomfortable and hard to push for my sisters and Me. Fear we will
need to invest in the $700-$800 sturdier chair instead.

Contractor says will source commode to be compatible with shower
chair. May ask him to source shower chair for us to ensure compatibility.
Meeting with him tomorrow to learn more.

Trying to make dad’s bedroom more conducive to his long term comfort.
And wanting situation that allows us to care for him with limited outside help.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to SistersCare
Report

I worked for a Visiting Nurse Assoc. and one of my jobs was renting out durable equipment.

I looked at the chairs you are talking about online. The ones I saw are PVC, which makes sense. The problem I see in being able to push this over a toilet, is the high back to them. If the toilet seat of the rolling chair is not right over the toilet, you wil have a problem. Also, to use something like this with a toilet you need a splash guard that takes place of the bucket usually used. The guard goes down into the toilet bowl and needs to be past the rim. On the on-line pictures, I can't tell if the legs are adjustable. To use the chair without a splashguard, the seat of the rolling chair would have to be right on top of the toilet bowl. The seats to the toilet would have to be up.

Hope I have helped.
Normally when I would suggest putting a regular commode over a toilet, I would tell the person to remove the bar on the back. This makes it easier to slide the commode over the toilet. Also, the legs adjust for the right height for the person. What is great about this set up, its the person using it has handles to help boost them up and legs for stability.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to JoAnn29
Report

I agree Amijoy, sometimes you have to be better equipped than a nursing home (because you don't have the luxury of extra hands), there comes a point where you have to realistically evaluate how much you can or will do to care for someone. I flirted with the idea of adding lifts to help after my mom couldn't stand to transfer any more but I realized that solving that one issue still left a dozen more, not the least of which was my own ability to cope with minimal outside supports.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to cwillie
Report

Sometimes, getting an immobile person out of one place (bed, chair, etc.) and into another place is darned near impossible. We have a Hoyer lift and sling but the last time I tried to use it, my husband had a panic attack and I was about to call 911. Also, make sure you use a contractor who specializes in handicap accessibility renovations. Maneuvering durable medical equipment around, especially in a bathroom requires a lot of room.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to Ahmijoy
Report

I think bed pans are pretty much a thing of the past except when relatively healthy people are temporarily confined to bed in an acute care hospital, mostly everyone on the forum relies in incontinence pads or briefs, portable commodes and/or toilet adaptations. If you are building a wheelchair accessible shower a mutli function chair would probably be a good investment, I looked at them for my mother but the price tag for any that looked both comfortable and functional was a little steep.

edit (I've been checking on line: I would steer away from the flimsy looking models with small seats and tiny wheels, to be truly functional you have to be able to actually push the thing with him seated on it. And these things are large so take the size of the bathroom into account and whether you have somewhere to store it when not in use. RehabMart lists the Mariner Rehab Shower Commode Chair on sale at a mid range price of $755, I like that it folds for storage.)
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to cwillie
Report