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My mother had a few episodes starting 2 weeks ago where she fell a few times. She had an MRI and they saw a 7mm aneurysm and evidence of a TIA. She also has Spinal Stenosis, Osteoporosis, Scoliosis. She was told a year ago to expect her legs to start going numb. Last Friday, the night before my wedding reception, she was taken to the ER with complaints that her legs were going numb. This happened in bed and there was no fall. After extensive tests including an MRI, no medical reason was found for the numbness and instead anxiety was the reason given for the numbness. Has anyone ever seen this before? I just cant understand how this can be. Are they say she was feigning the numbness or that the anxiety actually caused the numbness? They are being very elusive when explaining this to me, and I am left with a lot of confusion. Thanks.

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If your mother does not have dementia, then it sounds to me as though she imay be very stressed. You are getting married and she feel she is going to be forgotten. She wants to make a big impression at your wedding by wearing an appropriate dress. How old is your mother? First I would take her back to the dr. who diagnosed that she would eventually have this numbness. Let this dr. do further testing to determine if her conditions has progressed.

When I was 22 my first child was born. I was very sheltered by my mother and had no experience in life because she made all my decisions until I got married at age 19. I worked a 40 hr. work week plus taking care of my son, the house, yard, pretty much everything because my husband wouldn't help. I started having tingling in my hands, forearms, feet, and calves. It never went numb but felt like it was going to. I went from my PCP to my OBS/GNY no one could give me an answer. It got so bad one night I have my husband take me to er. The dr. on call asked me many questions including if I was getting help at home with a new baby. Because I had no experience, I said yes. He offered to give me valium which I refused because of fears of becoming addicted due to family history. Later I realized it was indeed stress. So yes anxiety can cause this but since your mother has been diagnosed with a condition that will progress into these symptoms, see her dr. that diagnosed it.
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A few months after my husband was diagnosed with dementia I exhibited a range of symptoms. Weakness, fatigue, thirst, unexplained drastic weight loss, among others. My PCP kept patting my hand and telling me it was understandable I was anxious because of my husband's diagnosis. She tried 3 or 4 anti-anxiety pills, one after the other. I even went in once with a written list of symptoms, but she didn't let me finish reading them because she was determined to try another anti-anxiety pill. Finally, at the insistence of my family, I showed up at an ET, where they had the correct diagnosis in less than half an hour: diabetes! Ignored, it had reached a life-threatening level.

Anxiety can cause all kinds of physical symptoms. And if anxiety is the cause, an anti-anxiety pill is the appropriate response. But based on my experience I would never accept that diagnosis for a physical symptoms without a second opinion. And ER is a pretty stressful and expensive way to get a second opinion!
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A cardiology check-up might be a good idea. My husband had similar experience - turned out to be congestive heart failure (undiagnosed by his cardiologist at regular exams). Be sure to get echocardiogram and blood tests.
2nd opinion from geriatric specialist good idea as well.
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I talked to the Doctor and even though he could not give specifics without her consent, he did feel it was stress related. I have put a lot of plans in motion WITH my mother so that she feels empowered in the choices that are made in the future. I also am going to setup guardianship jointly with others in the family so that she knows multiple people are looking out for her best interest. Life Alert was also ordered as well yesterday so that she can maintain her independence as long as possible. I think that with reducing the amount of stress and worry in her life, she can be stronger physically and hopefully an episode like this weekend will not happen again. Interesting how the mind can affect the body in such an dramatic way. I never knew that it could to that extent.
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Someone I know just diagnosed with MS with same leg numbness sensation but no other health concerns.
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I know that about a year ago she was given something for anxiety after my father passed away, but she no longer takes it. I have been told by two of her doctors that sometimes anxiety can cause psychosomatic response to stress/anxiety. I am just trusting that what they are saying is true but still seems pretty amazing that stress can cause leg numbness. I have another doctor to talk to today maybe he will say something different since he is her primary care physician and knows her best.
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The fixation on the dress and the "lies" about being called suggest to me that her mind is not working correctly, and the mind controls, well, everything, doesn't it? I don't know whether I'd call it anxiety or the beginnings of dementia, and I don't know exactly how it relates to numbness in the legs, but poor Mom needs love and support and careful monitoring to see what develops.

Did the doctor suggest anything for anxiety? What kind of doctor is she seeing at this time?
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I hear you. The only reason I am listening to their answer is that the closer we got to the reception and the closer we got to her current care giver moving out of state, the more emtional about everything she seemed to get. Regarding my reception, she was completely distraut about not being able to wear a dress to my wedding reception. I told her I do not care what people wear just as long as they are there, that is all that matters. But she seemed fixated on a stupid dress and would cry often about it. She also was making false claims about myself and my sister saying that we never call, but we call everyday! So is it possible that the doctor is right? Has anyone ever seen this before where extreme anxiety causes numbness in the legs or any other part of the body?
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Seems like it's the go-to response when doctors don't know the answer, 'it's all in the person's head'. Have you felt your mother's pulse at the ankle when her legs start going numb? Maybe we're talking about a circulation issue? Either way, get a second opinion if all you're hearing is, it's psychosomatic.
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