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Currently my sister in Puerto Rico has it. My sister sent mom to Connecticut in December (2014) where her daughters (2) took turns in caring for her. One of them was awarded the General POA. Because of their busy lifestyle, I was asked on many occasions to look after her during weekends and some weekdays. One of my brothers was also involved with caring for her as well. I was told that mom needed be in a stable place of her own and not bumped all over the place. I decided to move our office and create a bedroom so that she can stay with us. We are currently receiving care services at this time on a daily basis for my mom. My sister just recently came back from Puerto Rico and is now demanding to take mom away. I am the oldest and truly believe that she should remain with us. I am retired and will be there for her for most of the days. My other brothers and sisters seem not to care enough. Please advise. Hector.

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Agree with the above information by Pam & GA. Also want to gently point out, being the oldest or retired are not the qualifications for being the POA. Your Mom gets to choose her POA, and she alone can change it (as long as she's competent). The other siblings MUST respect mom's choice. If you wish to challenge mom's choice, and possibly become Guardian for your mom, you must be prepared to pay a lawyer out of your own pocket, and be able to convince a judge why you are better than the POA, and in addition, better than a non-related 3rd party professional Guardian-- in other words, you could spend thousands challenging your mom's choice and wind up not becoming Guardian but instead having the judge award your mom's care to someone completely outside the family! So, carefully consider the options. Maybe you should work things out with your sister so that your concerns for your mom are addressed. This is all about mom--not you, not siblings. JUST mom.
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Who was "awarded" POA? Did a Judge assign this award? If so, any changes have to back before that Judge, including decisions about where she lives. I think what you are referring to is Guardianship.
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Your profile states that your mother has dementia or Alzheimers. Unfortunately, people with those diagnoses are not considered mentally capable of executing or changing legal documents, so your mother can't sign a DPOA or other document with that diagnosis.

Unfortunately, I see a dispute arising between the Puerto Rican sister and you over where your mother should reside.
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