Alzheimer's patient wants divorce?

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Her home caregiver wants to marry her and had her file for divorce from her husband of decades. Her husband is losing her to Alzheimer's and to another man at the same time. What can he do?

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Fire the caregiver. Notify his manager of the situation. As the above recommendation. Get a lawyer to obtain guardianship
. He would need one anyways for a divorce
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He can petition the courts for an emergency guardianship and then work to make it permanent, in the process the court should be able to determine if she is competent to seek a divorce or is being unduly influenced. He needs a good lawyer.
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DeaneJ, who is telling the husband that the wife is getting the divorce? If it is the wife, we all need to remember that her brain is broken, and she could be just telling stories. Or does the husband have memory problems? It could be him telling stories.

Maybe the home caregiver doesn't know anything about this. And since the caregiver is male, it sounds like the caregiver is there to care for the husband, not the wife.

You need to find out more to this, so that people arn't blaming the caregiver for something he is not doing.
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Fire the caregiver.
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Are you absolutely sure the aide wants to marry her? Where is this info coming from. I would recommend asking the aide first. An Alzheimer patients thought process is not based in current reality. It could be something as simple as an innocent flirtation on her part and the aide, not to hurt her feelings, simply said yes I'll marry you. Perhaps snowballing out of proportion. Separate fact from fiction! Assumptions can damage an innocent persons entire life. If the aide is indeed pursuing this seriously contacting his employer and Adult Protective Svcs is next on the to do list. Tied closely with contacting a lawyer, perhaps through AARP, to obtain some form of guardianshhip and/or power of attorney. Family participation is a must to avoid any hint of improper behavior. Getting to the divorce, papers filed stage suggests a lack of supervision and oversight. Investigate and do not assume anything.
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Contact their employers immediately and get them replaced. Can you move in temporarily - 'to help'.
Like the other have said they need protecting straight away!
Good luck
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Most people with dementia say they want a divorce because the caretaking spouse is seen as the barrier to what they want because that's who stops them from doing things that are unsafe so they become the 'baddie' so when someone is kind they can latch on -

Is it 2 way or just in her mind - the outside person may not know what is going on in her mind - best to ask in a gentle way before you jump to a possibly wrong conclusion

She could not get a divorce due to her ALZ - no reputable lawyer or judge would touch the case anyway -
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There must be lots of assets involved.

I would fire and place a restraining order on this psycho, obviously he has some very serious mental issues. Get someone that can protect your parents as this person being thwarted will more then likely cause some very dangerous backlash.
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She Can't divorce him if has been diagnosed with ALZ or Dementia. She can no longer make informed decisions. No lawyer should have taken this on and should be informed of her mental state.
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It very well could be fabricated stories by the patient. Get her checked out by her physician and a geriatric psychiatrist.
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