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Gout came into my wife's life in February of this year after going for about 10 years without being on medication for it.
I have some turmeric and milk thistle pills I will be trying within a couple weeks. I am already giving her the sour cherry. She had a bout with C-Diff in April and her allopurinol and indomethacin do not seem to help and have a tendency to cause diarrhea.

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My link has been deleted I am told because the only links posted can be either dot org or dot gov and the integrated protocol link I wanted to direct you to was a dot com.

You can look it up yourself if you're interested. Just Google the three words natural, opinion, and out. When your page comes up, just go down 4 or 5 selections and select the one for gout natural protocols.
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For an integrative protocol, try this:

naturalopinion
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concepts essential to treating gout. First, it is critical to stop the acute inflammation of joints affected by gouty arthritis. Second, it is important to address the long-term management of the disease in order to prevent future gouty arthritis attacks and shrink gouty tophi crystal deposits in the tissues.
The treatment of an acute attack of gouty arthritis involves measures and medications that reduce inflammation. Preventing future acute gout attacks is equally as important as treating the acute arthritis. Prevention of acute gout involves maintaining adequate fluid intake, weight reduction, dietary changes, reduction in alcohol consumption, and medications to lower the uric acid level in the blood (reduce hyperuricemia).

Maintaining adequate fluid intake helps prevent acute gout attacks. Adequate fluid intake also decreases the risk of kidney stone formation in patients with gout. Alcohol is known to have diuretic effects that can contribute to dehydration and precipitate acute gout attacks. Alcohol can also affect uric acid metabolism to cause hyperuricemia. Therefore, alcohol has two major effects that worsen gout by impeding (slowing down) the excretion of uric acid from the kidneys as well as by causing dehydration, both of which contribute to the precipitation of uric acid crystals in the joints.
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