Am I allowed to see my mom's MAR at the rehab center?

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My mother is in a rehab center post a total knee replacement I am her POA on record, I requested to see her MAR from the nurse on duty this evening when I visited and was told it was a part of the medical record and I was not allowed to see it. I work in the health field, As a POA of her care do I not have the right to see her MAR's.

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Yes Medical Healthcare Surrogate Proxy written onto General POA specifically stating ability to access records for evaluation of contunity of care, can also designate as partner in care and care plan decisions.
May still have to get from DON or records.If not there when meds given. In giving as general poa and DCF Authorized Appointed Represenative (this is authorizing under HIPPA Law as Medicaid Pt.Appointed Rep. and Advocate for pt.)
This with written or verbal (case by case )permission to access records as General POA Partner in care DCF Authorized Appointed Represenative Payee Proxy.
If they deny this then make a complaint to ACHA (accreditation agency) and to pt rights violation. First must give them letter of grievance x3 etc. Look up pt rights.
Pt. does have right to their record. I always requests nurses notes doctors notes and copy medication sheet charts. These are not normally in what is given. Have often caught orders changed but not followed for days etc..

As Dr. Above noted these are sheets that can be used as legal evidence andoften rules strict. Re seeing sheets. Charge Nurse would be the appropiate person or D.O.N..whit proper credentials upon your part w parents permission.
I am assuming she is comopetent. Which in that case the Durable proxy would not be in effect. The DCF Auth Rep Payee Proxy would be ineffect w competant and incompetant.
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In most states you need to also have a Medical Power of Attorney to view medical records. Make sure the wording of a MPOA includes you may have access to medical records.
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I should have said at the bottom: If you really need medication information, and have been approved to receive such; call the doctors office & ask for it to be faxed to you or ready for you to pick it up the next day.
If you feel you need it that moment; ask the RN supervisor d/t they would probably have more time to make sure you are allowed & to make a copy or stand by you while you look at the original.
If the medication nurse is already aware that you are allowed to have this info & the nurse does not appear in the middle of giving medications... then ask her the question you want to know & let her look on the MAR & let you know what it says.

Once the MAR book is opened you can see all patients names on the tabs. It would be a HIPPA violation for a nurse to allow you to stand next to the MAR book d/t you might see other patients names.
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I'm a nurse & can tell you that nurses do not sharing their MARs with anyone, even other nurses, unless they are reporting to them/turning care over to that other nurse. This because 1) HIPPA 2) it's a legal document the nurse signs off on proving she has given each medication, the time & date, and sometimes why they gave it 3) it would be a HUGE problem if anyone wrote on even a small mark on these papers, lost the paper, spilled liquid on them... 4) it's inconvenient to the nurse if they needed to look at that paper while someone else has it, & nurses don't have time to be searching around for people or papers 5) it's time consuming for the nurse to deal with such a request, when they already have trouble finding time to eat or go to the bathroom 6) in general nurses don't even like anyone being close to their medication cart (where the MAR is) because they are often setting up medications, checking their stock, mixing liquid doses,... & it's a big distraction which can cause them to make a mistake with someones meds, plus it's always a worry that someone will steal a medication & them get blamed for it.
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odat1993, they will argue with everyone except the health department. So if you suspect meds are not given correctly, call the state health department hot line and they will respond quickly. You can also do an online complaint with the Joint Commission.
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HIPPA is the way to go for the fastest, cheapest route. However each and every doctor/medical facility will need one.
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Boy this is a thin line isnt it? I bet you just ovetlooked the the medical POA. Your atty should have made sure she signed one. We both knew what we wanted and cd hv probably saved money on the atty, but i insisted that we go thru atty. Just like everything else in life, use a professional.
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DPOA = durable power of attorney; DPOAH = durable power of attorney for healthcare. Most states require a DPOA specific for health/medical.

Patients have the right to request copies of their medical record and a DPOA can do this on their behalf, although some DPOAs only become valid when the principal (the older person) is incapacitated.

That said, a facility or provider doesn't have to provide instant access and they don't have to make it easy. They can require patients/DPOAs to go through a certain process to request the information, and sometimes they charge for it as well.

As to the MAR, I am a physician who goes into assisted living and I've found that they are often very squirrely about letting me access the MAR (medication administration record), which documents when medications were administered. I have been the prescribing physician and sometimes was told I can get a copy of the med list but not the MAR. (My solution was to take this up with the supervisor, which solved the problem for me; but a DPOA is in a different position.)

Sorry you are getting the run-around. Be polite but persistent, consider asking to talk to the supervisors, consider expressing concerns/complaints in writing, and you can also contact the ombudsman for long-term care to see what your options are. good luck.
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Is your mom able to make her own medical decisions? If so she would have to sign a waiver allowing you to view her records. If she is not able to make decisions then yes as her DPOA you have the right to request a copy of her medical records or view them. So many people even ones on this forum use the POA and DPOA terms incorrectly. A POA is financial and a DPOA is healthcare they are two different forms that do two very different things. Make sure you have both and for this situation the DPOA is the form you need. It is also refered to as a health care proxy, or assignment of health care advocate.
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It depends on how the dpoa was written. A well written one would probably allow it
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