Now they want to do Carotid artery surgery. What can I do?

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My 87 year old brother-in-law is in a nursing home recovering from Hip Surgery 2 weeks ago. He is quite weak and feeling discouraged. Now they want to do Carotid Artery Surgery. Should he get it done? How dangerous is it and should I put a stop to it? He also has two blocked arteries behind his heart that they cannot operate on because he would not survive the surgery. He has an abdominal aortic aneurysm. He has an inoperable diverticula on his lower esophagus with swallowing difficulties that could cause aspiration pneumonia. He has Alzheimer's, balance problems, and has to eat pureed food. I am HPOA and his advocate. What should I do?

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So wamnane if your brother-in-law has his faculties, there is no need to ask you what he wants done. So glad he is doing much better and an NG tube or gastric tube will keep him fed and nourished along with other meds. Walking is the best medicine for his hip surgery, and it sounds like he has a strong constitution to return to his AL arrangement. Best wishes!
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Yes well we got over that problem, but now we are talking about a feeding tube because he can't swallow properly and he is breathing food into his lungs. He hates eating the pureed food they bring him. They even puree the rolls. Can you imagine eating a wet roll? He has a thickening agent mixed with all drinks. He hates it and wants the feeding tube. That will eliminate the meds that he takes too. They can be pushed into the feeding tube. He is still capable of reasoning. He is actually thinking clearer than my husband who I have at home. My husband is good physically, not mentally. But my BIL is recovering from the hip surgery. He is actually taking about 75 steps with the walker. They think he will get better enough to go back to Assisted Living in the same home. I am hopeful and think the feeding tube is beneficial. I have all the legal POA and HPOA papers and the MOLST papers signed. He is DNR if the worst happens.
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I'm so relieved that your BIL is not going to have that surgery. I got angry at the Dr. just reading your post. Eventually our loved ones are going to have to die and at the age of 87 it would be kinder to let nature takes it course. The anesthesia alone is brutal.
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Medical professionals are REQUIRED to suggest the most beneficial procedures (even if there is NOT much time left). Speak to a medical professional you can relate to and ask what they would do for THEIR family member (in your shoes). Just because it is the BEST thing to do doesn't mean it's the RIGHT thing for you.
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Carotid artery surgery will increase blood flow to his brain, however, with all the other potential life-threatening issues he has, perhaps your best choice is to let him die without anymore suffering. You will not avoid the inevitable and if you discussed what he would want, then do that. How much time do you think you will buy him? Alzheimer's is a terminal illness...
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wamnane, thank goodness the doctor decided to not do surgery needlessly. I'm happy for your BIL and you! :-)
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Thank you all! The doctor did check him out and decided he did not need it! Thank God for a doctor who considers the needs of the patient!
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(posted in accident before I fished) - how many other untreatable things are wrong with him such that his life expectancy is likely to be short regardless of whether he has this surgery. This is a risky surgery for a person who is healthier than your brother-in-law and would involve considerable discomfort to him so look at the larger picture and base your decisions on what you think is best for him, rather than what the surgeons (who have their own agendas because surgeries = income for them) want to do.
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Did you ever have a discussion with your brother-in-law in the past when he was competent to understand regarding what his wishes would be in a situation like this one? I know that I would not want the surgery for myself if I was in that condition and have made that clear to my children now, when it is clear that I am capable of making a decision like that about my care. If there is no living will and there was never a discussion about his wishes then you will just have to do what seems right given the information you can gather. It honestly doesn't sound like a good idea, given how many other untreatable things
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I agree with ba8alou. I'd also ask myself, if I were in my BIL's condition, would I want all these surgeries at 87 years of age. Personally, my answer would be a resounding NO! I am absolutely amazed at some of the suggestions and decisions doctors come up with for the elderly. Blessings for your BIL.
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