Any advice when meeting with a Medi-cal attorney?

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Hi I'm meeting with a medi-cal planning attorney & im looking for advice as usual. What paperwork should I take? What questions should I ask? I'm caring for my mom in her home. I secured a reverse mortgage to hire help for her so I can get back to my life. My goal is to keep her in her home for 4 years with myself & caregivers. I'm seeking medi-cal planning if it gets to be too much physically or financially before the 4 years. I want to make sure I have that as an option. Any advice for my consult?

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Igloo, yes I am basically living with mom in her home to keep cost of 24hr care down. I have my own home, a spouse, a career I may go back to. Ideally I can keep mom home 4-5 yrs. she's turning 88, her dog is 10. Her ailments are relatively easy to manage still with some adjustments. She has dementia but she doesn't wander & her attitude is good. I'm planning for when the RM money is spent & her conditions worse or im older & unable to continue to offset the cost. I want to make sure I don't spend anything that Medicare will penalize for. Lawyer I saw today says it looks as if I'm on the right track so that was good to here.
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Momshelp - are you living with your mom at her home that now has a reverse mortgage? And do you need to live at this home in order to have a roof over your head? Or do you have your own place, so if something were to happen so mom cannot be ok for terms of the RM & RM calls in the note, it’s not a problem?
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lawyer's comment was that 2 years gave her an idea of patterns since some folks have staggered income...good for you getting prepared.
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Thanks Guesthopadmin, that was very helpful. I know it's 5 years as of now but I'm looking at what's been or will have been my responsibility at the 4 year mark. Your suggestions were great, I had most ready to go but only 1 year of taxes.
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Um, Medicaid in most states is 5 years, not 4. And there has been discussion about 7-10 years possible, just fyi. My in-laws attorney had a packet of questions and list of info that in-laws were supposed to bring that you could download off website. Needed social security award letters, list of pensions and current payouts, last 2 years of tax returns, list of real estate, autos, and other assets, list of current credit cards and outstanding loans especially if student loan guarantees or liens on property, list of doctors and current diagnoses to make sure eligible for Nursing home or Assisted living care, life insurance or long term care policies, any prepaid funeral policies, any annuities and status if in required minimum distribution, health insurance policies and supplemental policies, bank accounts, IRA's, etc.
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