Any advice on what helped your parents when they were in rehab?

Follow
Share

Dad fell and is in rehab. This is his second full day there. He is in a lot of pain when he tries to sit up, and I think that he's very depressed. I plan to spend several hours there every day, both to cheer him up and to provide what physical help I can (the place appears to be somewhat short staffed). Any advice on what helped your parents when they were in rehab? And any advice on how to keep sane in the midst of all the stress?

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
23

Answers

Show:
1 2 3
Watch them because they may make the patient do something too soon! One had my mother doing PT @ 7:00 A. M. Now I ask why...a 94 year old woman?!! She ended up having a stroke and she deceased!!!!!!!!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Check to see that your dad is getting the best advice and the equipment for easing his sitting pain. Press for answers about the equipment. My mother should probably have had a donut pillow to sit on or a special cushion. She had hurt her tailbone which had been fractured earlier in life. ~ Make sure the physical therapist has a complete history of past injuries as well as the present. AND make sure that the people who ARE there are encouraging. (Otherwise get him to someone who will actually help him improve.) I wish I had done all these things before it was too late. You might consider an "improvement poster" so he can track his improvements toward his goals. (He should have at least one or two :) They help a lot.) Along with a healthy dose of sympathy (not pity) and a cheering section maybe his depression will improve. Chronic pain is depressing all by itself. I hope this helped in some way.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Zyrthr, That's our goal. If Dad can go home (assisted living) soon with an increased level of care, that would be our preference.

mrussell, Dad is supposed to receive pain medicine prior to the therapy sessions. For the most part, that has been happening, although we've had to remind them once or twice. The pain seems to be lessening now as Dad heals.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

AngieJoy

What can help parent(s) in rehab is getting them out of there as soon as possible.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I had my dad in AL a couple of times. The facility is supposed to be one of the best. They messed up his meds, ignored him when he came in to go to bed, and made him eat in the dining room when he didn't want to do so. Some of the CNA were the sweetest people; don't know how they could stand to work there, but bless them. The place ran out of clean linen and that they noticed at the end of the day so that I had to go to our IL apartment and get some. They moved him out of his room because somebody else wanted it and lost his clothing in the move. Some patients took off their clothing and sat among the others in the buff. The answer to why was that patients were free to do what they wanted. I moved my dad back into IL with me the next morning. The worst part is it's mostly the management, not the CNAs. I hire a caregiver when I need one and thus keep costs down. I also do all the work myself as the IL section is equally poorly managed. There is a market for quality AL services.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Communicate with nursing staff and therapy to make sure he has his pain medication before therapy so he can show progress. Ask therapists about non-medication methods for pain management if appropriate for him -- ice, heat, or other modalities they may have. If he is walking or able to transfer from surface to surface, see if therapy will do a home assessment with him to give him more encouragement about returning home (if that is the plan). Talk with occupational therapy staff to see if they can incorporate some of your father's interests in a daily therapy session (puzzles, gardening, tools, fixing things). I hope this helps.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

GardenArtist, Thanks for the suggestion of the checklist. Using a checklist might be very helpful. Dad and I had planned to take care of the tooth brushing together after lunch every today, but yesterday he was too tired (because lunch was preceded by a lengthy therapy session). I was able to talk to the nurse practitioner yesterday. She looked at the rash and set up a treatment plan for it. I'll ask Dad if it's being followed. I was also able to discuss Dad's meds with the nurse practitioner in some detail (I already had received a med list that the weekend nurse printed out for me).
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Angie, you might have to list the areas of concern, ask for a meeting with the DON and whoever's in charge of the aides, and ask whether these are issues they address. Perhaps not, but at least you'll be aware they're not getting staff attention, and can make plans to integrate them when you visit.

I don't think the aides really get involved in daily dental hygiene and similar tasks though.

If you made a checklist for your father to follow, in a sort of matrix for different days and different times, do you think that would help him? You could keep a copy and if you call in to say good night to him (which I always did), you can then check off which items have been taken care of. If they haven't, you can call back in an hour or so.

It is unfortunate that family needs to be so involved in some of the ADLs, but overall, I guess I'd rather do that than some of the other tasks the aides take care of.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I can't even imagine how someone manages in rehab without an advocate. I feel sorry for the aides, too. I can see that they are really overworked, especially on the weekends. I've been going over in the middle of the day to help Dad with lunch and to talk to his nurse, therapists, and so on, as needed. I really don't like to go home and leave him there. I feel like I'm abandoning him. But I can't stay there 24/7--it would drive everyone crazy, including me.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

You've gotten wonderful suggestions so far. My dad was in rehab after a stroke. He was a Chief Master Sergeant in the Air Force, so was used to ordering people around. He was rude to the staff when they didn't hop to it when he rang. I finally had a stern talk with him about catching more flies with honey than vinegar. He listened (for once) and was nice to the staff from that point on. You want them (and need them) on your and your dad's side. So being kind and considerate of the difficult jobs they have goes a long way to seeing that your dad gets good care.

The fragmentation you're seeing in your dad's care is rampant. The left hand has no idea what the right hand is doing. No one communicates or double checks. Your dad is lucky he has you to advocate for him about tests and meals and results. Just imagine the poor seniors with no one to look out for their best interests.

My dad did great in rehab and regained about 95% of his function after being at death's door right after his stroke. So rehab can be a wonderful experience with excellent outcomes. Good luck and people keep us posted.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

1 2 3
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions