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I'll add my agreement. If the person isn't upset by the passive therapy, it is likely a good idea because it may help with pain and range of motion issues. However, if the person is upset and combative, I'd opt for letting it go. Discuss it with the doctor if it's a problem, but in the end, you an only do what you can do.
Take care,
Carol
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Good question. It will depend on how agreeable she is. If she will allow the therapist to move her, even passively, she could benefit. But if she resists and is combative, can't see how she will be able to receive the benefit.
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I agree with peoplepleaser - as long as she can participate, she can benefit, although she won't benefit as much as someone who remembers yesterday's exercises and can build on that. The goal is less that the person can improve than that the person can maintain the skills they have rather than getting worse.
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The therapist needs training on how to work with people with dementia. Check with the AA for a training class on communication with patients with AD. Persons with AD are DIFFERENT. they need to be treated according to how THEY respond, not how non-AD patients function. Too bad that health professionals with AD clients are not required by State Regulation to be certified and licensed for treating AD clients. There are many articles on the WEB on the benefits of, and NEED for, therapies and massage for AD patients [and everybody].
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Do you really think someone with advanced dementia is going to "benefit" from PT? You don't do ROM for a fractured shoulder which I think you mean clavicle, but PT will benefit your feelings more than hers. Her muscles are slowly going into atrophy anyway and movements probably will be painful. Would you want someone making your last days more painful?
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