Are there adult day care centers for dementia patients?

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Would senior centers be a good fit?

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My husband does all this too.He is tearing up everything that I have.My husband became sick overnight in nov. with this.Don started vomiting and couldn't stop so we call ambulance and they had to give him a shot for his heart.It was beating 25 beats a min,The doctor says it is fast kind of dementia and he will last about a year.It is breaking my heart because we have been married 52 years and he has NEVER been sick.I don't have any answers but I can tell you some of the things he does.He don't like to sleep anymore --stays up all day and night.When he wakes u p he is instanly mad or crying.He always was a happy soft spoken man.He is now saying I want to go home. He doesn't know he is home. I ask him did he want to go be with Jesus and he said not yet I just want to go home
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Thanks all. I have electronics that have to be recycled, ones he have had a field day with! He even cuts the wires and you are able to see the copper. He has tried to plug that in! He knows that electronics have to be plugged in to work, so he plugs them in to see if they are working and if not he's back to the drawing board.
He picks up everything and move or tinkers with it. Loves ink pens, pocket full, safety pins planned everywhere on him, remote controls, removes the batteries, lamps removes the bulbs, ceiling fans pulls strings until they pops or turn switches until broken. Turns tv from chanel to Chanel and unplugs believing it's broken. Now hiding his medicine hands it to him then pockets it. Don't know how to keep him from being "too busy with his hands"!!!!!!
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You do have to look around for appropriate senior centers that do accept dementia patients. I actually visited one that was secure and they were quite security minded. It was clean and well staffed too. I don't know if they provided lunch or not, but, it seemed like a safe place from what I observed.
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EagleEye, Just now, husband woke me up using my hairdryer to melt the solder balls on a computer that he was given by a well meaning friend. Dozing off just after midnight, here I am, AWAKE NOW!
Just a quick visit to let you know you are not alone.
I am trying so hard to be understanding.
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EagleEyeT00, I think I'd make a trip to a local thrift store or even to an electronics store that takes items to recycle so you have a ready supply of broken items for him to fix. You'll have to be sure he doesn't try plugging things in, though ... as I suppose you do now when he "fixes" your working items.

He seems to be at a stage where he needs a lot of supervision. Is there anyone who can help you with that?
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What can I do with my husband who has dementia and likes to take apart anything electrical? TV, computers, telephones, all clocks, anything he can get a screwdriver or knife to take apart. He usually thinks they are broke and he is the one to fix the problem. By the time he finishes tampering with it, it's broken! Can't leave locks lying around and he will put anything in his pockets that will fit. He never takes blame and says people has keys to the apartment and let themselves in and causes the damage. He doesn't know them!!!
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Forgot, she gets therapy there to. Helps to keep her moving.
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I agree. Go to the Daycare and have a tour. Some do lock down. Moms doesn't so she is kept far away from the front doors. Moms provides transportation to and from the house. Saves me over 30 miles on two round trips. They also shower her for me. There is a cost if the parent has over a certain amount of money. If Mom had none, medicaid would pick up partial or the full cost. The only thing I don't like is that she is home by 2:30. Not good for family members that work. Moms is a county program.
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Please spend time at the day care before you make a decision. I visited one and saw the saddest faces, an unclean bathroom, a few crackers and cheese for lunch, and a few minutes of chair exercises. I could not
subject my Mom to this. If I decide to look again, I will seek recommendations, and be diligent about checking out the facility.
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If you are in a major metropolitan area there should be adult day centers available. As others have said, the Area Agency on Aging should be able to identify centers in your area. Also, the State is more than likely the licensing body for adult day centers in your area. They will be able to provide you with a list of licensed facilities. Here's where it can get tricky because each day center may be a little different and cater to a certain population. You will have to visit each center you think you're interested in to see how they operate and who they're primarily serving. Some will cater to people with dementia, some will not and even if they did you wouldn't want to leave your loved one there. There are privately owned and operated (usually non-profit organizations and some of the larger senior living organizations) adult day centers specifically for people with dementia. These will be your best bet, but are usually expensive and not normally covered by Medicaid (the former that I spoke of usually are). Some of the assisted living communities will offer a free "respite" day as a means of exposing you to their community. You may want to contact some of them to see if they offer this service. In the Houston area my company offers free respite via partnerships with area congregations. They are not day centers, but certainly provide a wonderful opportunity for caregivers to take advantage of respite services as well as provide an opportunities for people affected by dementia to engage in mentally stimulating activity.
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