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Father is 64 his sisters are 74, they spend his money gambling and claim he is mental. He just wants to live on his own. How can we as his children take over to help him?

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Let me get this straight, your Dad is 64 and is living in Assistant Living, and his sisters who are 74 [twins?] are taking care of him but spending his money.

Curious what is the reason your Dad is living in such a facility as such a young age? And how are the sisters getting his money? If you Dad is in assistant living that means he cannot live on his on unless he has around the clock care.
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Hi. We need a little more information. You say that you are caring for your father and that he is in assisted living. But, then you say that his sisters are caring for him. Assisted living is very expensive. Maybe they are paying his bills? Normally, children would be next of kin, not siblings.
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I think he's asking about control of dad's finances and his living situation sounds like it's with the sisters, not in a home. More than anything, it sounds like they need to step in and protect dad's assets from the unscrupulous sisters. Why are so many sisters so ready to screw their brothers over? I have 2 evil ones that would do this to me in a flash, if they could.
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If your father is in Assisted Living, in what sense is he being cared for by his sisters?

Your father is only 64, very young for this. What are his care needs?
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If he does not have a POA and is not competent, you will need to go to court to have a guardian appointed. You'll need proof of wrong-doing by his sisters, if they petition the court for guardianship based on his existing living situation, so start collecting that evidence now. Good luck!
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Does your father have a Power of Attorney? If not, assuming he is still competent to do so, have the attorney draw up a POA and all the related estate planning documents. Make sure that he names a person as POA that he trusts will actually follow his instructions and wishes and that he trusts will act properly on his behalf. This may be the most important decision he makes in his life.
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