Will adding my wife and I to my mother-in-law's land title affect the 2 year lookback?

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My mother-in-law lives with us, but owns a home and land, free and clear. She has no other assets. Her home requires about 50K repairs before we could live in it. If we live there and provide services Medicaid would pay for over a period of 2 years the house will no longer be seen as an asset and would not be subject to a lien if she should need Medicaid. It has been suggested that my wife and I have our name added to the title so we can use the land to borrow money to repair the home. My concern is this will reset the "lookback" from 2 years to 5 years. Am I correct in my belief?

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It is always a five-year look-back. If a child lived with the parent for two years before the application and provided care that kept the parent out of the nursing home, the parent may transfer the title to the child without penalty. But Medicaid will still perform a five-year look-back on any other transactions.

As sharynmaire advises, this isn't really a good do-it-yourself project. Consult an attorney specializing in Elder Law in your state.
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I honestly don't know. I thought it was a 5 year look back. I suggest you to seek advice of an elder law attorney on thisl Really state laws vary from one state to another and getting the facts from an attorney in your state will have more authority than what I know. Hugs to you!!
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I have answered my own question. The answer is adding anyone to the title will be considered a transfer and trigger the 5 year lookback.
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Actually, if an adult child lives with a parent in the parent's home and provides services Medicaid would pay for otherwise the lookback is 2 years. My original question stands - will this action reset the lookback from 2 to the full 5 years?
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It's 5 years not 2!!
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