Are there any activities my Mom can do having dementia and is blind?

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My dad also has dementia but is not blind. They are in ALF. Dad reads to her but they sit in a small bedroom all day long.

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You might try A fidget quilt. A Custom Fidget quilt can be geared for someone that is blind. More textural, beading etc. things to "feel and touch" rather than "do".
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To me it really depends on their level of dementia. This can change from week to week too. Somethings that may amuse them one week, may not the next.

I learned first hand that things that I thought my cousin would enjoy, weren't that amusing to her. It's a trial by error thing.

I would go with the music first. Are either of them still able to turn on a radio? If so, this can liven up the room. Even those with advanced dementia seem to respond somewhat to oldies music. And if CD's may be played, I would look for some old radio shows that have comedy.

I know of a lady with advanced dementia who loves to play the harmonica! She's played her entire life and still loves it. Sadly, she can't keep up with the harmonica and can't keep it with her all day.

I might explore little toys that you can touch and they respond with comments and music. Look in the children's educational section. I'm sure dementia websites have them too.

Ask the social director where they stay about pet therapy and if they have any animals coming in weekly that they may love on.

I would also check to see if there are any church groups that come to their ALF. The ones I know of have a regular church service in the dining room every Sunday, plus special singing groups that come every week. And don't they have BINGO every day? That might not work for mom though.

Some dementia patients like to keep their hands busy. I think there are online dementia sites that sell devices that provide that stimulation, but my cousin left that stage and she no longer knows what to do with her hands and those things don't interest her.

Sadly, when dementia is advanced, it's difficult to do much except comforting comments, touch, nice fragrances, soft clothes and blankets, and music.
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Is there a nice common area where they could sit while Dad reads to Mom? Is there a place outdoors where they could do this? That would give them a change of location, at least.
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Singing! My momma played church hymns for my daddy throughout his battle with dementia. He would hum and sing along. This often brought a smile to his face.
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My mom is blind, she goes by herself, on the bus to the downtown casinos, she eats buffets and gambles, for at least eight hours, two or three times per week. Maybe she shouldn't, but it seems to be keeping her alive.
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Something else just occurred to me. The infusion center where my sister had chemo treatments created a few small sessions of therapy using art, ceramics, etc.

Ceramics doesn't always need to be seen to be done, and could be done by feel. Perhaps just working with the clay might be something your mother would enjoy.

I thought of assistive gardening as well - is she able to create things by feeling, such as making a wreath of scented flowers or herbs?

What about baking bread - if you get it started, your mother can do the punching down - that doesn't require sight. Then the 3 of you can enjoy the aromatherapy of bread in the oven, and make the event something to remember.

I'm trying to think of other things that are creative and done by hand - that kind of stimulation might be good for both your parents.
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I did a quick search as I know this question has been asked more than a few times recently. Here's one hit:

https://www.agingcare.com/search.aspx?searchterm=activities+for+the+blind

You can also search on "acitvities, dementia", or something similar, to see what others have written in the past.

I'm wondering if they prefer not to participate in any activities at the ALF? What about musical events, pet therapy, if these exist at their facility?

What kind of reading does your father do - fiction, nonfiction, travel? Do they discuss the literature afterward, kind of like having their own book club?
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