I am at a loss as to what activities my mom can do to keep her occupied. Suggestions?

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My mother spent much of her adult life working and having children, I am one of ten. Then when she and my father retired she confiscated my younger sister’s two children and raised them (poorly I might add). Then she confiscated the great grandchild up until we had to remove my mom from her house. She was not happy about it but she has middle stage dementia and she couldn’t live there even with help.
She doesn’t have any hobbies. She used to volunteer at the kids school. She would sit through hours of cartoons on the television each day. Never really had many friends except for her neighbors.
She will sit and look out the window for much of the day (it is a great view of the forest), or stare at the newspaper for hours on end. She does like the Golden Girls and I bought all 7 seasons to play on depend. I will take her for a walk but her knee is in very poor condition so I can’t get her out too often. PLUS, winter is coming and once the snow is on the ground it is going to be very difficult to get her out to do anything.
The senior center here really doesn’t have any activities for people with dementia and the only adult day care that we had in town was 4 hours once a week and apparently that is no longer going on.
I’m trying to find activities that might be of interest to her but I’m striking out. Are we destined to be watching the Golden Girls for hours on end.
I work out of my home so I can sit at the table and keep an eye on her while working but she seems bored. Or am I projecting????

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Here's a few ideas from a different forum....watching a lava lamp, battery operated stuffed animal that makes animal sounds, dominoes to stack or knock over or put away, a slinky, play dough, a bubble machine, a book of what's different between these two pictures, a liquid puzzle where the different colors go through, a pillow pet to cuddle, magnets, a kaleidoscope. I think the idea would be to try to stimulate a variety of senses- touching different textures, listening to different sounds, looking at different things (besides tv). If this interested the person these things could occupy them by himself. It might be interesting to go through a Toys R Us store or a place where teachers buy educational things for the classroom. Did someone already mention the Alzheimers store?
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my mum likes arrow words magazines and keeps thier brain active. Also bingo is an easy game for them to play is there any bingo going on in the community? also daycare i have still to get my mum to go to this. Some days shes ok some days shes aggressive shes so bored but she wil watch tv all day
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the one thing that occupies my mom and she can do them for hours are the Word Seek puzzles. The nice thing about them is that they search for a word for a few minutes and if they can't find it they can look for another one of the words on the page. My mom does them for hours now. she doesn't like puzzles or cards, unless she is at the senior center (day care) otherwise with us she has no interests but the WordSeek puzzles. We have a large stack of them. When she finishes one book we replace it with another.
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icpiia so sad for your FIL. I am sure he really does not want to go on living but sadly he has no choice in the matter.
My suggestion is to find him a "job" do you have neighbors who would help you out and "hire" him. You could actually give them the money to pay him with. Simple taskes he could do inside or out side the house. Empty waste baskets, clean the kitty litter, refill the dogs water bowls. Sweep the garden path shovel some snow. Tie up newspapers for recycling. Just anything that he wont make too much of a mess doing. it would give him something to do and get him interacting with other people so he has to make an effort. If you are in a rural area do you have a local store that could "hire" him to break down boxes for recycling. Could he hand out prayer books in church and greet people if you go to church. There are so many little things if you can create a routine to make him feel necessary and productive. because he is still grieving so much trying to find things for him to do at home probably wont work right now but once you get the activities going he maay show more interest. If you have a local hospice they do have grief groups who meet regularily. that might help. You and/or your husband could go with him the first few times. Let us know how you get one. if solutions work for one family it is very helpful to pass on ideas to others facing the same situations.
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Jcpjja, would he be able to help outside in gardening, watering plants, filling the bird feeders, spraying for ants? Or sorting thru the usually messed up collections of nuts and bolts, untangling strings of Xmas lights, sweeping up the patio, washing down the patio furniture, something practical and manly as opposed to crafty? Is there a way to give him a Honey-Do list of things he can handle? For women (I know gender bias) how about a trip to Build-a-Bear or similar store where she can pick her own toy and dress it for herself or grandchildren, or the poor children for Christmas. Also, if there is an artsy place where you can pick your greenware at the store to paint together, then have kiln dried. I did that with my mom. I did two pretty colorful little tropical fish. She did a worm, and was happy to paint him green with brown eyes and mouth. This by someone who used to make her own greeting cards for friends. Everytime I see what we did I smile.
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My MIL is in the early stage if Dimensia, I try to play card or board games with her, she also like macrame.

Hope this helps.
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We need assistance finding something for my father-in-law. He has dementia and since his wife died he has lost interest in life. He was married to my mother-in-law for 60 years and she was the only woman he ever dated. He misses her so much that he just can't get her off his mind. He says he never sleeps, and doesn't want to live. He thinks if he had a job that he would be able to keep his mind occupied and wouldn't be so miserable. But you can't reason with him that the fact is he is 84 and has dementia and he wouldn't be able to get a job. We have bought him books to read, and he will read a little but then stops reading. He reads the newspaper, but that doesn't help much. He thinks he needs something to keep him occupied all day. And when he does something he doesn't remember it much. I feel so helpless because at times he feels so desperate. I ask him if he wants to watch TV and he says no. We've tried to get him to do puzzles but he doesn't want to do that. Does anyone have suggestions on anything where he could spend a couple hours a day to help the situation? I appreciate any ideas.
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caregiver, she is currently on Medicare and won't qualify for Medicaid until next April.
I did stop by the Center on Aging in our town and got a list of respite providers. It is in my pile of things to do. It's been crazy trying to get her to all the doctors appointments and last weekend she was hallucinating so it's been a ride so far.
I would really prefer an adult day care but if respite care in our home is the only option I may go that route and start interviewing people to come by for a few hours each week, for a start.

She does like folding the blankets that we have on the sofa. Our two little Bichons mess them up often and I find her straightening them out. She loves the dogs too and the wildlife that she is able to see out the windows.

She is in the middle stage of Alzheimers. She scored a 19 out of 30 on that scale they use. She seems to be there much of the time and is still capable of showering herself and eating. It's such a strange disease because sometimes she seems there (maybe wishful thinking) and other times she tells the same stories from her early days over and over. So very odd.

Thanks again for all the suggestions. I did buy her a doll and I think she will like that. She has a couple but more for display rather than cuddling.
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More activity ideas suggestions:

1) Folding towels; matching and folding socks together; folding shirts and other laundry

2) Putting coins in a piggy bank; sorting coins

3) Purchase a children's xylophone:
And ask her to come up with a tune. And because the xylophone is colorful it
should peak her interest.

4) Get her a realistic looking baby doll and ask her to "babysit" it.

5) Get an old fashion rotary telephone and ask her to dial some phone numbers from the yellow pages. Make sure the telephone is not connected and unplugged. And if she wonders why the phone isn't ringing or no one is answering, well come up with an excuse :-)

6) Organize and or alphabetize canned goods.

7) Clip coupons from the newspapers, whether you use them or not. Use children's scissors to prevent injury.

8) Cut out interesting articles or pictures from newspapers and magazines

9) Organize a messy drawer

10) Water the plants

11) Play yo yo
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@PinkLA well I do hope you find one soon or some sort of respite program.
I know you said you called 3 facilities if they knew of any but did you call your mom's insurance for a list? Does she only have VA and does she also have medicaid as well? When I contacted my grandpa's medicaid, they said they had a list of other adult daycare facilities that he can go to (other areas) in case we don't like the daycare he's currently attending. So we have that option.
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