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He has not been able to operate audio book players because he has poor short term memory and forgets how to do it. He won't watch TV because he misses too much without the visual.

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uwatch2, Would she enjoy books on tape? Google "Library for the Blind" plus the name of the state where you live to get information on books on tape for the blind. Also, would she enjoy having you read to her? You could ask her what types of books she likes, check some out of the local library, and read them to her. She also might like to listen to music and news programs on the radio.
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I am a caregiver for an elderly women who is 83yrs old. She is recently blind and barely able to walk due to bad knees. She is as sharp as they come and bored out of her mind. What can I do to keep her entertained? She loved plays and was very into art. However now that she has lost her sight this can no longer be enjoyed. What can I do to help her enjoy the remainders of her life?
Please help! She has no family locally although she is in very close touch with her son but he lives out of state. So I'm it!
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I believe that the visually impaired are at a great disadvantage in any facility, it was one of the reasons I chose to keep my mother with me. Add in dementia and I feel it becomes almost impossible for them to integrate successfully. Navigating hallways cluttered with med carts, residents in wheelchairs and with walkers will be difficult. The sameness of each area make finding his way, even finding his own room, without the help of visual cues difficult. Meals will be problematic if staff doesn't take the time to orient him to each item on his plate, and unfortunately some sighted residents may dislike dining with him if he misses his mouth or ends up with his elbow in the soup.

Activities are also going to prove difficult. Musical programs are always a good bet, but make sure that staff knows to be sure he is able to get there. A good facility should have adaptive aids available for him such as playing cards and bingo cards specially designed for the visually impaired. All of it will become harder for him as his dementia worsens. Finding a staff member of resident that can take him under their wing will make a huge difference, and hopefully enable him to feel more at home there.
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Does he enjoy music? My dad's independent/assisted living has lots of musical events. I think that volunteers from the community come to sing and play their musical instruments. Also, if you want him to meet people, possibly you could talk to the staff at the nursing home and ask for their help. I don't know how seating is set up in the dining room (assuming that he eats in the dining room), but maybe the staff could see to it that he is seated with the same group of friendly people for, say, every dinner meal for a few weeks.
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Here are links to other posts on activities for people with low vision. (Each link might have some duplicates)

https://www.agingcare.com/search.aspx?searchterm=low+vision+activities

https://www.agingcare.com/search.aspx?searchterm=activities+for+blind+patients
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