What activities are there for a blind senior?

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My mother is legally blind on top of her other problems. Need some suggestions - thanks!

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Contact the National Federation for the Blind to get recorded books free of charge - you will need to provide a letter (or fill out a form that they provide) with her doctor's signature and contact information, stating that he/she has severely impaired vision to qualify.
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How about the service on tv that is similar for closed captioning for the deaf....it describes the action on the screen so they can follow the plot/action of the show.
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My mother is 90, has macular and cannot see. I live with her and help her as much as I can. She gets bored, and nibbles constantly to keep her hands busy. She finally got used to her eReader, and now loves it. She could never select her own books from the catalog. I download her fav authors from the BARD website to her jump drive. A 16g drive can hold 20 books or so. I rotate them for her when she's done.
Also Ive seen Humane societies bring small dogs into nursing homes for regularly scheduled visits. My mother would love that. I'd like more pet approved places provide that service Independent Living and Assisted Care Facilities. It helps all involved, including the dogs.
I encourage her to walk the wonderfully decorated hallways or to ride her Jazzy, just to 'get out' and socialize.
Mom used to crochet, but has so little feeling in her fingers, she can't feel the yarn anymore, but needs to do more with her hands besides eat and nibble.
We're open to other suggestions.
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I companion sit for a partially blind 93 year old lady. It is challenging finding activities for her to keep her from sleeping all the time. These are just a few I have come up with. I would love to hear any other suggestions.
- wind yarn into balls (sometimes I take already wound balls and have her rewind them again since she can't see that they are already wound)
- string large pony beads on a plastic lanyard (I have enough for 6-8 strands. Then I just take the beads off the lanyards so she can string them again)
- I bring her out to the kitchen and set her at the kitchen table. I wash smaller, lighter dishes, measuring cups, plastic cups and bowls, etc. and place them on the table in front of her so she can dry them. We have a dishwasher but this gives her something to do.
- I shake out clean hand towels and wash cloths and place them in a small laundry basket and have her fold them for me. This is great with fresh laundry I am doing.
- I give her a dusting rag and have her dust knick knacky items from the living room and around the house.
- I give her a stretch band and exercise ball to do leg, arm and hand exercises with.
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Criscoe, I'm sorry your post received no answers. If you're still around, post your question as a separate thread and more people will see it.

Scahlll, use the search function to search for similar answers, as this question is raised periodically. This might be a good start:

https://www.agingcare.com/search.aspx?searchterm=sources+for+books+for+the+blind
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Where can I order get books for the blind.
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My niece is very mobile and lost her job of 20 years cause the government decided they didn't want to sponsor the program any more. She is 58 and wants to work. Does anyone know of something for a blind person to do. She is willing to do volunteer work just to be with people. Thought of her joining a senior program but at a loss???
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try your local YMCA
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I work in a long term care facility and I too struggle with meaningful activities for the blind residents. Some things I do are polishing silver or brass, items to dust, cleaning baby dolls, folding laundry and since Easter is approaching we will fill plastic eggs with candy. Always seeking new ideas.
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A few things that I have found both my blind father and a blind elderly client enjoy include doing crossword puzzles together- I read the clues out loud and they think of the words and doing a kind of scrabble together. For that game I bought some metal cookie sheets and letter magnets ( the kind you put on the fridge to help children spell) at the dollar store. They can feel the shapes of the letters and make words. It's fun for them and keeps their brains active.
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