Follow
Share

A senior resident passes away but in his trust writes a provision to allow one of his daughters age 53 to now live in his condo.


How can this person who is not 55+ move into his condo?

I suppose it’s up to the ruling members of the board. It’s only two years difference. Nice of him to leave it to her. His money, his choice. He must have had his reason for doing so.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to NeedHelpWithMom
Report

I'm another member of the family. The father left a trust fund that will cover all expenses for the condo. She will not have to spend a penny. actually it is not a "condo" but a quad building. He owns one of the four units.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to tigerpilot16
Report
Isthisrealyreal May 3, 2019
What a loving gesture from a father to his daughter.

Are you angry about the situation or are you trying to help her?
Just curious because your tone seems upset that he provided for his daughter. Should it have been you? Were you his caregiver and she was absent?
(2)
Report
In Florida it’s 80/20% in the 55+ communities but they make plenty of allowances for those under 55 to reside as “occupants” rather than “owners”. Many condos.. blocks of condos.. were bought up for next to nothing during the the last housing bust and are currently rented and occupied by younger people.

Better to be filled and collecting those HOA fees and county taxes than sitting empty is the way it’s looked at. 🙂
Helpful Answer (2)
Reply to star97
Report

I guess I have two points here, first it's probably ultimately up to the condo rules and board and I know the one 55+ around here has an allowance for a certain number of units being used by younger residents, I think this is probably for just this kind of situation as well as a family's need to draw income from a unit if it's hard to sell so they can rent it. Some may say an under 55 resident can't access certain amenities, the dining room for instance if there is one but it seems only practical and fair to have ways around the 55 age cutoff as long as the resident isn't creating a problem or nuisance while keeping the balance overwhelmingly 55+. If this resident who recently passed and his daughter liked and were attached enough to this community, passing it on to his 50+ daughter who wants to live/ retire there seems like a wonderful thing. She would be very familiar with the set up and probably many residents and it's like passing on his house to his daughter accept in many ways it's securing her retirement and aging as well, sweet actually. Had he not passed for 2 more years there would be no issue, how would she be different and how do you know she's 53 if I may ask? I could understand concern about having younger parents/families or parent age people move in maybe but this seems like splitting hairs unless there is some other negative here. Seems more practical for everyone other residents included than having a temporary 2 year renter in there just because they are 55 or over, don't you think?
Helpful Answer (4)
Reply to Lymie61
Report

Its only 2 yrs. And if she isn't living there who is going to pay the fees and upkeep? It would be in everyones best interest that she is living there. As long as she otherwise doesn't go against the rules, I see no problem.
Helpful Answer (4)
Reply to JoAnn29
Report

The trust does not trump the rules of the condo. However the condo board could make an exception and allow the 53 year old to move in. But there is nothing to compel a condo board to waive the rules.
Helpful Answer (2)
Reply to Tothill
Report

Were do you figure into the equation? Are you the daughter?
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to Isthisrealyreal
Report

All 55+ communities here allow a certain percentage of younger residents. I would think that would be the same everywhere.
Helpful Answer (3)
Reply to gladimhere
Report

Ask a Question

Subscribe to
Our Newsletter