If my husband goes into a nursing home, must my 2 annuities in my name with my husband as beneficary be part of co-owned assets?

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I am the owner of the two annuities with my husband as beneficiary. If he goes into a skilled nursing home, are these docs to be reported under our combined assets (or are they protected)? What is the allowable assets to be kept by me besides my IRA's. What about my life insurance policies?

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Only one suggestion if he is going into a facility, you need a good elder law attorney. If you have a trust it is time to change it. And one thing to consider to add in there is that if a family member steps up to assist in your care, payment to that person should be specified. There are many people on this site in a situation where they have siblings that do not offer help, and do not want to have their inheritance impacted.
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If you anticipate that hubby will need to apply for Medicaid to pay for his NH, please please go an see an elder law attorney sooner rather than later.

Most of the postings on this site are dealing with an widow or widower who goes into a NH & Medicaid, but for you there is a whole different application process. If you yourself do not need a NH, you are considered the "community spouse" for Medicaid. You do not have to impoverish yourself for hubby to get Medicaid. You are fully expected to keep enough money to remain in the community. Just what the amount is for CS depends on the state and some annuities / investments are excluded from the tally. You as the CS can apply for MMNA - monthly maintenance needs allowance if you need some of hubby's income to stay living in the community. there are other issues that are different for when there is a CS. But the key is that whatever you do financially have to be done BEFORE hubby applies. Really there is a lot of details and having good legal go over your options will be well worth it.

For example, you all have done what most couples do in naming each other as their beneficiary. This makes total sense when you are younger. But now if hubby goes onto Medicaid, you do not want him to be the beneficiary any more. You don't want him to possibly inherit any funds that would stop his Medicaid
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They remain yours and yours only until you die. So are your life insurance policies and your IRA's. They will be available for your care so long as you outlive him. It doesn't sound like either one of you will ever need Medicaid, but what you need is a solid estate plan to keep your heirs from squabbling, and a plan for who would be your DPOA or Guardian should the need arise. An Executor who is impartial and strong-willed is recommended.
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