Financial Power of Attorney - AgingCare.com

Financial Power of Attorney

Through a durable or nondurable financial power of attorney, seniors can allow a caregiver to handle their finances and often real estate matters. The person appointed must be at least 18 years old. Seniors can limit these powers and can revoke them. Learn more about financial powers of attorney.

Articles About Financial Power Of Attorney
  • What to Do When the Bank Refuses a POA
    You planned ahead and were named power of attorney, but why won’t they accept it? Know the three main reasons why financial institutions might prevent you from accessing your loved one’s accounts.
  • Adult Children Sue Caregiver and Get Unpleasant Surprise
    When a group of adult children tried to sue their father's partner and caregiver, they received a shocking verdict. This cautionary tale exemplifies how misusing a power of attorney can have serious legal and financial consequences.
  • Financial POA: How to Manage a Senior's Expenses
    Using financial power of attorney to manage a senior's expenses is confusing if you're not organized. Learn 7 ways to keep finances on track.
 






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