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If your care giving duties allow you time to read.....................I'm interested in what book you are in the middle of or just finished or have waiting on your bedside table.


I'm reading "Total Control" by David Baldacci


It's a crime/thriller drama. Quite compelling.


If you can't find the time to read, you should try. It helps to escape from it all in a good book.

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Just starting These Toxic Things: A Thriller.

Looks to be a great one so far.

The toxic things belong to a woman that has been recently diagnosed with Alzheimer's.
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Just finished we begin at the end (great book )
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I finished "The Plot". Highly recommend it. Now I can see what this online book club is all about.

Now shopping for my next read.
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I've read and enjoyed all the Ruth Galloway series Pamz, they are a lighter read without being cutesy or mind-numbingly lame and unbelievable like too many in the cozy mystery genre.
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If you like mysteries,, I just read Black Widows,, and Madam,, both quirky and interesting I am also reading all of the mysteries by Elly Griffiths,, have read some new ones, so now trying to read them from the beginning.. her main is a female forensic archeologist in england who works with police..
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I just read, on another thread, about a virtual book club site. A new book is discussed every two weeks. The book for September 14 is The Plot, which I have wAnted to get working on more diligently for awhile now. Maybe this will be the push I need.

Oh, the book club?

https://zibbyowens.com/virtualbookclub

The thread I read about it on?
https://www.agingcare.com/questions/please-recommend-an-online-book-clubscrabble-club-online-activity-group-im-an-empty-nester-now-469680.htm?orderby=oldest�
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Am re-reading Possession by A.S. Byatt and reading The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich.
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I tried a light cozy mystery and it was silly. Others have been much better and I enjoyed them.

Right now I am back into classic British mysteries of the past - British Mysteries Ultimate Collection: 560+ Detective Novels, Thriller Classics, Murder Mysteries, Whodunit Tales & True Crime Stories.

I have a similar collection which I have pretty well read to the end, so am picking through this one to find authors the other book didn't include. They are very good value for a few bucks.
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First cozy mystery, beachfront bakery, a loser. Did you ever just skim a book to just get it finished so you can start something else? I did.

Mrs Rochesters Ghost was great kinda a rewrite, modern approach to Jane Eyre.
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I've recently read a couple of books by Tana French, she's been on my must try list for a long time but for whatever reason my library hasn't carried anything by her until now. Apparently long time fans were not thrilled with either book because they veered away from her regular Dublin murder squad series, since I wasn't hung up on that I enjoyed them very much!
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Mrs. Rochester's Ghost. Interesting, I am enjoying it.
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I still have not finished Ruth Reichl's "my kitchen year", and am getting through a stack of older magazines to pass on in an effort to get through the build up of papers/recipes/clutter fire hazard:-)
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Garden Artist,
I love those magazines too. I live in the country and it brings back many memories of years gone by with my family. We were very close growning up.
Don't let anyone take away your pleasure of reading upbeat stories. In a world of negativity and stress it is great to have some good reading that is postive.
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Yes, I agree that magazines with only negative articles wouldn’t have much of a market, and we all need to look on the bright side. What gets to me is that all these upbeat articles in our trade magazines are so high upbeat that you suffer from lack of oxygen. Oz is the land of ‘droughts and flooding rains’ plus fires and at the moment trade embargoes from China, but there’s never a mention of the fact that a lot of farmers are going broke or into nervous breakdowns. Just pictures of happy families with exciting news and lots of smiles.

It comes across loud and clear that the trade association management and the journalists aren’t actually living it. I once asked a guy who was well connected in wool production, if any of the Board would ever have washed a woolen jumper and dried it flat, after several articles about how much better wool was than any of the synthetics. He thought for several seconds, then said ‘probably not’. It would be reassuring to feel that the powers that be do actually know about the problems in the industry!

Anyway that’s enough. I’m glad that someone finds it so pleasurable and relaxing to read about, and particularly glad that the someone is you, Garden Artist!
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Margaret, I guess the articles wouldn't be selected if they weren't positive, at least in some way.   That applies to those which relate some less than positive situation but share how someone addressed it.   I'm thinking now of the article in which a family had to quarantine at Christmas b/c one of the children got a contagious disease, one of the ones that appeared years ago and for which there was no vaccine at the time.

It was unsettling to read about using Lysol on the patient (actually, I more than cringed!), but the tenacity of the family in dealing with the situation was inspiring.

I wonder if people would buy magazines which addressed only negative situations.  We read about that daily online!
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Garden Artist, I’m glad that the magazines are so helpful for relaxation. I don’t want to burst your balloon, but they are so unrealistically positive that they do the opposite for me. Being on the land (at least here, where we have virtually no subsidies for farmers) is really tough, and things go wrong more times than right. The lovely ‘homes’ and ‘gardens’ in the country belong to the rich with hired labor. Even our industry newsletters are doggedly positive – successes only please. Grrr!
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Just finished Ocean Prey by John Sandford.
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I've temporarily switched from books to magazines, specifically the ones to which my father subscribed.   I'm pleasantly surprised by how much they relax me.   I'm reading Country and Country Extra, with Reminisce and Reminisce Extra and Farm Ranch in the "to read" pile.

The descriptions of life in the country, on a ranch or farm, are so diametrically opposite from life in a heavily populated metropolitan area that I find myself relaxing as soon as I pick up one of the magazines, some of which I've read twice.

I understand why Dad read them so faithfully; they were soothing and while not necessarily absorbing, they redirected attention from tense books, or political issues plaguing the country, or pandemics.  They reminded him of better days, and of less friction that our modern life seems to entail.    I'm really enjoying these magazines and decided to keep them instead of donating them.   I can read them every year or so, or especially when I get neurotic.
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The Bourne Betrayal
Novel by Eric Van Lustbader

I got the book from a “Little Free Library” in my neighborhood. Take a look at www.littlefreelibraries.org. There may be one near you. Take a book. Leave a book.
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The Round House by Louise Erdrich. Really good read.
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I'm reading a book titled Search for Her by Rick Mofino. I guess you could call it a good summer read. Not great but not bad.

I've been on a bad book streak lately. You know that feeling when you finish a book and say to yourself, well, theres a few hours I can never get back. 🤔
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I was looking at Origins and thought it sounded interesting.
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This list might help you Glad

https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/3810.Best_Cozy_Mystery_Series

I've enjoyed almost everything by Charlaine Harris, especially Sookie Stackhouse, Auroa Teagarden and Lily Bard
The Stephanie Plum series by Jan Evanovich is old and I don't know if they've stood the test of time but when I read it I would actually laugh out loud.
I very much enjoyed the China Bayles series by Susan Wittig Albert
If you like cat mysteries the Joe Grey books by Shirley Rousseau Murphy are fun
Another easy read is the Miss Julia series by Ann B. Ross
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GladImhere, I forgot to mention the latest Dan Brown novel I've read:  Origins.   It's a tech thriller, addressing the big question of what happens if/when AI segues into independence and makes decisions for itself, overriding or ignoring the intents and programming of its creator.   I read another novel on the same principle but can't remember the name right now.

I think AI progression beyond human control might be the new science fiction focus.

https://danbrown.com/origin/
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Cozy mysteries are quite fluffy - easy reading! Just google for them and you will find a big selection.
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Thanks CW and GA. Some fluff recommendations? There I would be completely lost!

GA, those sound like excellent recommendations. Seems I read a Margaret Truman once, a very long time ago.
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Gladimhere, I haven't read While Justice Sleeps, but it sounds like a good one for my collection (one can NEVER have too many good books!).   And I'm really impressed with Stacey Abrams.

Have you read any of Margaret Truman's political thrillers?  And yes, she's a presidential daughter who knows DC in and out.   I've read probably almost all of hers, some of them 3 or 4 times.  Her talent clearly progresses after the first few books, and the complications heighten the mysteries.

https://www.goodreads.com/author/list/1559.Margaret_Truman

Evelyn Anthony is another political writer, but I haven't read any of her books for years, not deliberately, but b/c they're in my "storage" library and I just forgot about them.    Hers are more international, if I remember correctly.

And yet another good mystery writer was Alistair MacLean.  His novels were set in different countries, adding an international intrigue to the plots.   If you've seen Guns of Navarone, Force 10 from Navarone or Ice Station Zebra, you've seen movie adaptations of his novels.  Geopolitics seems to be a strong theme in his novels, and always with one spy who's integrated him or herself into US action teams.

https://www.fantasticfiction.com/m/alistair-maclean/
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Library e-books are the best! thing! ever! You can download tons of stuff (well, up to your limit anyway) and there's absolutely no reason for regret if you find a book isn't worth finishing.
You might want to add some fluff to your reading list for those times when you can't concentrate on anything deeper.
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Just finished While Justice Sleeps, a political thriller, never read one before it was quite good!

I must get my library card reactivated with weeks of recovery coming up so I can explore the digital options available. Seems there is quite an extensive digital library lending site with a valid card.

Any recommendations anyone? I enjoy mysteries, thrillers and the like the best. Might have to see what Dan Brown has available. Haven't read anything of his in a long time.
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I am halfway through Nomadland; I bought the book after seeing the film reviews. I think it’s terrific. The sense of place is amazing. I feel I am there with these travellers, and am in awe of their bravery and resilience.
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