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If your care giving duties allow you time to read.....................I'm interested in what book you are in the middle of or just finished or have waiting on your bedside table.


I'm reading "Total Control" by David Baldacci


It's a crime/thriller drama. Quite compelling.


If you can't find the time to read, you should try. It helps to escape from it all in a good book.

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It's ok Margaret, nice really!
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OK!
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Good for you, Margaret!
And thanks for sharing the humor around.
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I hope you don't mind, Sendhelp, I've just reposted it to the Jokes thread.
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Due to the Stay-at-home order. I finished 3 books yesterday,

and believe me, that's a lot of coloring.
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GA, After Sundown by Linda Howard and Linda Jones was published in hardcover Mar 31, 2020. I doubt the research on solar events and survivalist living could have been done in the 4-6 weeks after the coronavirus gained attention in mid January for a hardcover release so I don't think this one was virus inspired/motivated. Like you, I expect there will be some.
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I am reading through the Joanne Fluke murder mysteries. They are very good.
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TNTechie, was the novel written/published before the Coronavirus pandemic? I'm curious b/c I anticipate that a series of climactic or governmentally dystopian novels and movies will be produced later this year, and mass catastrophic events will be featured as the events which tip civilized society toward or over the brink.
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My kobo glo has died. I tried a factory reset, twice. Nothing. 😥 I know that at 10 years (or more) it is ancient, but...
I guess I'll have to read on my desktop for now 😣
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Just finished a Linda Howard romance framed within a solar event, a Coronal Mass Ejection or CME, that takes down the power grid in large areas of the globe for over a year. The setting for the story is rural Wears Valley in Sevier County, TN - one of the most beautiful places on this earth. The total breakdown of "government" and infrastructure within a few days and how the Wears Valley community implements a new self government is an interesting story line, although Howard clearly doesn't appreciate the true mix of former military, small farmers (with their fuel tanks) and firearms actually present in the real valley. Still a very interesting read.
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I'm just getting into Viola Shipman's books. Almost done with The Summer Cottage and looking forward to getting the next one when the libraries around here open back up!
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Daughter and cw - both your books look good. So many books to read, so little time...

I'm still working my way through The Great British Detectives, and am well into the Father Brown series by G.K Chesterton. I like the character of Father Brown in these short stories but am kind of missing longer tales.
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I'm half way through the new stand alone book What Rose Forgot by Nevada Barr. Rose shares some of the superwoman characteristics of Barr's Anna Pigeon but if you are willing to suspend your eye rolls and disbelief at her physical prowess it's a wonderful read, this author really knows how to create a characters/reader bond.
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Just finished The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes, historical fiction about the packhorse librarians program started by Eleanor Roosevelt. Enjoyed it!
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Not reading tonight, curling up with 'Under Milk Wood' for comfort and Richard Burton's voice.
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The past couple years I've pulled out a few old books from my parents, Grandma, Dad's life long friend, a college era regular customer from the days of my waiting on tables eons ago.
This sampling includes Air Force men from WW11. Another details the life of Black Americans In Aviation , the 1975 edition (this title given me by a Black customer, whom, when I was leaving my West Coast life for the South, he thought it would be a good education to know about the Tuskegee Airmen. He wrote the book along with one other black man in aviation and they worked at General Dynamics. It's really neat to have this autographed copy.

A neighbor/friend of Dads who was a POW in East Europe during the war gave me a copy of his war diary. A Department of Defense publication (dated 1969) about how to build fallout shelters is in the collection.

My grandma had a couple cookbooks - a 1915 economy cookbook and a Donner Party Cookbook. My grandma also had a book about Rosie the Riveter.
I believe in controlling clutter and just "stuff" that collects from time-to-time. Over the years and with each move, many books have been donated.
As of now I still can not part with these books. They cost me nothing but mean everything. These are among the few books/items/furniture that have followed me to every address I've ever known.
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CM, sorry for that graphic reminder.
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Ugh, thank you very much for the reminder - I will now have excerpts from The Hound of the Baskervilles running through my head all day. When the kids were little we spent a lot of time in the car and had the story on cassette tape...

"Mr Holmes, they were the footprints of a gigantic hound!"
"I trust I have not inadvertently..." "Just a little," said Holmes, with some acerbity.
"He was running, Watson, running for his life!"
" - Is there no such thing as a gentleman!"
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Goodness yes, so he was, Golden! But... not such a good storyteller, perhaps?
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Finished reading all the Sherlock Holmes books and have started on Father Brown mysteries by G K Chesterton. Although I very much enjoyed Sherlock, Chesterton was a better writer than Conan Doyle.
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The last Stephanie Plum book I bought was Explosive Eighteen. On my booklist, I notated 'Not read'. Beside the author's name, I noted: '***NOT READ ANYMORE**. It was the same old story over and over. No growth, etc.. I gave up on it.

I'm currently reading a sci-fi series by Marissa Meyer, titled Scarlet (book 2)... First time to read this author.... Book one ended as a cliffhanger.

I was listening to YouTube "People Share their Most Unexplained Experiences". The OP mentioned a book: The Gift of Fear. I checked Amazon. Hmmm I bought this book? Yes, I did. I'm going to read this along side Meyer's. I bet this Gift of Fear will have some great personal experiences of people's gut feelings!
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I think I'll try something I normally wouldn't read if I wasn't working on getting nervous.   So I think I'll try Ulysses.  I anticipate it'll take me an hour or so just to read one page, and that's assuming I can understand it.   By the time I read a few pages, I'll be ready to doze off and get a good night's sleep, pandemic notwithstanding.
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Isn't it great that reading is still free (unless you go out and buy a book) If we have to self isolate we can still read! Yay!
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Oh Chark,, she puts one out a year like clockwork! I get them from the library, and they notify me when new ones come out by authors we like. They are getting a bit … worn out.. but Grandma and Lulu are a hoot! She is up to somewhere in the mid 20s now,,,
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C. Willie,

You’re right about the Plum novels are sometimes tedious. She doesn’t put them out as often anymore. I can’t even remember a recent one that I can name, but I still enjoy them when they’re out. (Silly me, they’re all by the numbers.)

Sometimes high expectations ruin the enjoyment but Lulu and Grandma Mazur are always fun.
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Re-reading:
Y2K: A Reasoned Response to Mass Hysteria
by Dave Hunt

Y2K never happened.

Dave Hunt was an American Christian apologist, speaker, radio commentator and author. He was in full-time ministry from 1973 until his death. A prolific best-selling author, international lecturer, and Bible teacher, his writings have been translated into at least 50 languages. More than four million copies of Dave’s books have been sold. For nearly a decade, Dave also co-hosted a weekly radio program, Search the Scriptures Daily, broadcast on over 400 stations in the U.S. and worldwide.
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I’m re-reading Kipling, Captains Courageous. A good story, no surprises for me, soothing and enjoyable.
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pamzimmrt, I love the Hamish McBeth, and Agatha Raisin series, and have read through all of them at least twice! Light, fun reading. There’s a reason they’re called “British cozies”!

I am presently reading The Dysautonomia Project. It was suggested reading by my daughter’s cardiologist/dysautonomia specialist. She has dysautonomia along with several chronic disorders. I have been on a mission to educate myself about this invisible illness.
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Yoda,

Fascinating topic. Mayhem and triumphs throughout history, right? Every generation has it’s challenges and achievements.
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I'm reading a book about the church leaders in eastern Europe who came after the Apostles and eventually pulled together what is called the Eastern Orthodox Church. My minor in college was history. I love reading history.
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