Has anyone on this site put the shoe on the other foot and realized that you will be old too someday?

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Our culture has completely changed. Years ago, a senior parent living alone would be living with one of the children and be part of the family. Now they are expected to live alone or in some Senior adult home or assisted living, which now costs a FORTUNE. People think "The Waltons" was fiction, but it was not. When a Senior parent loses their spouse or is left by their spouse for a younger woman, it is difficult to "start over" at that age. Most of their friends have passed away or moved. Family used to be everything. These days even a phone call is too much. How things have changed, and not for the better.

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member = remember. I have a headache tonight -- sounds like a good excuse.
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I think you're right, cmag. Probably most people's families were like Married with Children, but the parent member it like Leave it to Beaver. (I picked the Beaver, because only the kids caused the trouble in that show.)
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I don't think the Waltons, Leave it to Beaver, Father Knows Best, etc. reflect the reality of anyone's home life 100% anymore that the Norman Rockwell's painting of Thanksgiving.

We tend to think the past was the good old days. However, the history books tend to remind us that there were very bad things back then too.
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JessieBelle - I agree with your last comment (not to imply I disagree with any prior comments). In my family, it was never "one for all and all for one." It was always "Each man for himself." My mother was the first to leave - she sold the house as soon as the youngest kid graduated high school (seriously, my youngest sibs had no place to return to when they came "home" on college breaks) and then moved to Florida while the rest of the family was still in the northeast. She really didn't involve herself with her grown kids or her grandchildren. Then, when she started needing help, she expected us to band together to pull her through. But there was no banding together for us and most of them aren't the least bit interested in pulling her through. Nobody feels that kind of commitment to her, or one another. It burns me, really, that people expect to cared for by family when they have not bothered to be part of that family. It burns me that society expects virtually limitless sacrifice on behalf of people we wouldn't even have in our lives if we weren't related to them.
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Kimber, Soo true! In a perfect world, we would all have perfect families to take care of us like on tv. Hope for the best and plan for the worst, have a plan B, and stay positive. Few of us get the exact script we wanted. Happiness is a choice!
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I thought this morning about why most families in the US are not like the Waltons. It is because families are not raised that way. Really, you have to have families that pull together from the very start. Parents have to love their own parents and pull their own children in close. Notice that the Waltons does not have have unresolved sibling rivalry and all children are treated with age-appropriate love and respect. In ordinary families, parents are less than perfect, people often dread their own parents and in-laws, and the children are often left to their own devices.

In a nearby county there are families where the children are home schooled and the families are God-centered. Families do everything together and attend a lot of church events. It seems rather dysfunctional to the outside world, but the families do tend to stay closer.

I guess what I am saying is if families wanted to be like the Waltons, the family would have to be built from an early age. After the kids are grown and on their own, it is too late to try to build a Walton family.
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My dad uses the Walton's example also when he presses to live with us (the answer is NO!!!) Only his idea of the situation is that he would sit in the middle of the room, tell me what he wants for breakfast, lunch, dinner, (obviously I would quit my job) and that he would be the head of the house, even though it is our house. not contribute but rule the roost as the elder. The last discussion ended in my laughing and saying something about pigs flying
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The wonderful actor who played Grandpa on the Waltons, late Will Geer, started a theater group Los Angeles. It's outdoors in a beautiful canyon, still there. I saw summer Shakespeare there a couple of years ago.
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Rovana: What makes you think we haven't reached out? That isn't the problem. But when you're in the late 70's, your close friends have either moved or passed away. The new ones are more like acquaintances. It isn't a question of looking in the wrong places either. The problem with giving advice is assuming you know the whole picture, and of course, you don't. This was merely a discussion of culture change. Everyone is different. Some feel that they'd rather spend their final years with close, loving family. What you want may be different.
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Hereforyou, Your original question certainly sparked some lively debate. It got me thinking. I'm too busy taking care of both parents, their home, and running their business affairs, to dwell on it. I'm trying to arrange my life so I won't be a burden to my son.
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