Has anyone noticed how society has changed?

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Remembering clearly my earlier years when the entry door to Our home was never locked, never not even if We the Family were away for a long few days since the door was left closed shut. I can recall how caring We all were towards each other, and if one Neighbour needed help saving hay, or picking potatoes whatever it was We all came to help and never looked for money, since it was the done thing. People had away more nature then too, and had pure innocent minds since no one had a television, and We made Our own entertainment. We played rings on the ring board hanging on the kitchen wall, snakes and ladders, Ludo, draughts, then We progressed to chess, and cards..snap was a great favourite. The Girls used to skip with a skipping rope..I have not seen any Child skip in years. When We had the long fine evenings We played Gaelic Football, and hurling and since We My Brothers and I lived on a dairy farm We often rolled a barrel up to the top of a very hilly field, crawl inside before the barrel took off gaining speed, and We got the greatest fun from the simplest things. All of Us had Our chores to do as well since many hands got the work done sooner. I remember the Telegram Boy often calling to Our home with news from far away. The Telegram Boy was dressed similar to today's Post Men, with a suit and belt plus His bicycle. We were so happy and content. Neighbours called to Our home at night to visit, and I can recall vividly No One would ever utter a bad word about another. If People didn't have some thing good to say, They said nothing at all. Oh Lord how times have changed. How so many love to yap about others affairs, and stick their nose into every Ones business. It often makes Me Laugh when I think these are the People Who can rectify every Ones Lives except their own. It still bewilders Me how a rumour can start, without an ounce of truth, and by the time it has travelled three miles it has grown many legs, and tails too. My conclusion is there is a nastiness in Society, a kind of envy or jealousy that never existed before. Now every home has to have a Burgular Alarm, cameras, many have motorised gates, Security is very essential now. Indeed many People keep a loaded shot gun near by at night. AND WE NEVER KNEEDED TO LOCK OUR DOORS THEN. How Blessed I do feel to have lived in a beautiful time, yes In the time of Our Youth when Children felt safe, and there was a kindness and a goodness in People. We could not have known it then, but this time would be the best time of Our Lives. While very few had money in abundance, the philosophy was if You can't afford what You'd want, learn to make do till You can afford it. Borrowing money was a non runner since it was considered bad mathematics to borrow X from a Bank and agree to repay three times that amount, hence Our Parents Generation never brought trouble upon Themselves, and They were so content. There was no grandeur either, since keeping up with the Jones's was never heard of then. Most of all People felt safe in Their beds. People worked extremly hard and there was no tatsby in those times, but with My hand on My Heart I have not seen times nearly remotely as happy as then. There was no narcotics as drugs weren't even heard of. Children could walk the roads safely, and most of all People respected and loved one another. IF THERE WAS A TIME MASHINE THAT WOULD TAKE US BACH TO A TIME OF MY CHOOSING, I WOULD GLADLY TRAVEL BACK WITHOUT A MOMENTS HESITATION, TO THEN. ...........QUESTION IS WOULD YOU, ?

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Regarding older houses, I and a partner use to specialize in selling houses built in the mid 1700's to early 1900's. I use to tell first time "old home buyers" that they needed to have deep pockets and a sense of humor when buying one of those fantastic older residences. We always knew who were true buyers.

Glass door knobs, love them.... same with pocket doors :)

My Grandparents house is Connecticut had a well inside the house near the kitchen. I remember Grandma's wood burning stove. Grandma had heavy curtains on the hallway frame between the kitchen and the rest of the house.... brrr the rest of the house was very chilly. On the bed heavy goose down quilts, so thick that one could play hide and seek and no one would ever see you under that quilt :)

jinglebts, I checked on the internet and was surprised that companies here in the States still make these craw type things... they are called screen door catch. Didn't see any photos of the very old ones that were black with black rollers on them.
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Blackhole: My daughter/SIL/grandkids live in a very old house in Toronto -- I think the foundations date to 1885. Tiny, high ceilings, and still some old knob and tube when they renovated their kitchen. I recall hearing abt wall fires when I was much younger -- my grandmother's house had knob and tube. OTOH, it had lovely squeaky hardwood floors and a fireplace, real.

Daughter's house has a minute bathroom as it originally had only a WC. And you can see the chimneys for the wood stoves.
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GA: Morse was in Oxford, and I used to try to find landmarks. I recognized the Randolph Hotel and the Martyrs’ Memorial (Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Hugh Latimer -- they were burnt at the stake on Henry VIII's orders), and there are many parks that I don't recognize individually but I do recall taking my daughter in a stroller there many times (Oxford University parks?), and a pub called the Eagle and Child (Bird and Baby to the locals) was inhabited by J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis. Trip down memory lane!!
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ff: Weird looking claw thing? What? If we did have locks on our screen doors, they were of the slide variety. I don't remember seeing any tho. Huh.

GA: Yes, the milk hatch! I recall having one in a new house in the 'fifties! My grandmother didn't have one in her house tho -- they left it on the front step as I recall. And they delivered milk in England long after they stopped in Canada. Also on the front step. Loved the creamy stuff that floated to the top. Heavy cream?

And in England you'd get the post twice a day! (Maybe that's b/c phones were slow to arrive in UK households -- if you wanted to ask someone to dinner, you'd pop an invite in the first post, receive an answer by the second, and make dinner for four that night. The only time I recall being invited out by a true Brit we were served tripe. Gag.)

Ah world!
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Jingle, your mother sounds like a very educated, diversified and intelligent woman. Her Christmas activities are truly unique.


Jessie, bag boys? I had completely forgotten about having someone pack grocery bags. Had to think for a moment what they were. Wandering down Memory Lane as I reread some of the comments, including yours, I remember volunteering to walk to the local store and um, well, flirting with the bag boys! That was eons ago.


I do miss the days when there was more help at the gas stations. It would be nice if there was just a covering or canopy over the air and gas pumps to protect an old woman trying to put air in the tires. Now it's all out in the open in wind and rain.


BlackHole, we still have glass door knobs in our homes. Even though I don't think about it often, they do lend a special touch with their faceted, sparkling design. sometimes they remind me of diamonds.

I think I'll take them with me when I move!


PamZ, remember lay-away? That was well before the introduction and widespread use of credit cards.


Old houses....such charm, hidden places. We lived in a duplex owned by my grandparents. The bedroom my sister and I shared was unique; it has so many memories. The closet part of it was over the staircase and angled, so there was less room, but it was special because it seemed so magical. Sometimes I think of the magic wardrobe in the Narnia Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe sequence.


CWillie, now you've done it! I'm off, meandering in dreamland, thinkg about those beautiful, magnificent old Tudor and other older style English houses, their magical gardens, the sense of peace and solace they convey.

One of the PBS series (Inspector Morse, I think) features some of those beauties, and sometimes one of the universities. I think it might be Cambridge but I honestly don't even remember much about the episodes because I'm immediately lost in flights of fancy dreaming about visiting or even living in such charming and beautiful buildings.

There are a few neighborhoods in my area with historic houses. They're larger houses, probably from about 4 to 5,000 square feet. There are Craftsman, Tudor, Moorish and other homes. I frequently cut through that neighborhood just for a peaceful relief from the chaos of the 8 lane trunkline highway outside.

There's another neighborhood of even larger houses, probably in the 7 to 8,000 ft. range. Some are located near the Cranbrook complex, our little piece of England in Michigan. There's even a cathedral which offers free outdoor concerts on Sunday afternoon in the summer.

Drivingi through that area is a wonderful respite after a sometimes stressful visit to the hospital or rehab center.

In another smaller neighborhood close by, the homes are each unique, individualized, with various elements from different architectural styles.

What's especially charming is that every year residents of one block of houses place lunaria on the lawns close to the curb.

On Christmas Eve, to drive down that street is truly the essence of beauty - quiet, understated,peaceful, and not austentacious like the sometimes charming but overwhelming massive blow-up ornaments.

Detroit also has sections of homes that used to be magnificent. Indian Village has been maintained well, from what I've read. (I don't venture into Detroit any more).
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The thought of those old European homes makes me a bit uneasy. Some of them look a bit sinister. Sadly, many of the old homes and structures in Italy have been destroyed in the last year or two. They weren't built to withstand earthquakes at all. They crumbled into piles of rubble. It was sad to see whole towns and villages wiped out like that.
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And yet they are living in houses in Europe that make our old homes look like teenagers.
The thing that scares me most about older homes is the hidden repairs and "upgrades" that have been done over the years. I would rather buy a totally unimproved home bought at a reasonable price than one that has been improved beyond recognition or hides structural or electrical nightmares. Oh the dreams I had for our old farmhouse... I hope the new owners are treating her well.
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Old houses were built so well. They are wonderful if they were maintained. They're an albatross when they weren't. A lot of people back in the old days didn't maintain their homes very well. Termites and water takes their toll.

When we had some siding repair work done here, I was shocked to see that there was not a stitch insulation in the walls of this 1949 Alabama house. The space between the siding and plaster board was considering enough. I was also shocked to see all the damage that had been hidden by the cedar shingles.
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Oh how I miss the bag boys. I took it for granted when I was growing up. By the time I was a young adult and self-supporting.....poof! No more bag boys.

Had milk delivery when I was a kid, too. No milk door, tho. Ours was in a metal box on the front porch. That was very exciting to me.....as was the daily mail delivery. Not sure why. Maybe because kids had a limited range when I was a tot. No toddler gymnastics lessons, no movies in the car, no bi-lingual preschool (heck, no preschool!).....

My current home was built in 1930. Has a decomissioned coal chute. And a laundry chute that gets lots of use! Glass doorknobs. Picture rail in LR and DR. Kitchen window above sink is topped with a scalloped bulkhead....and half-moon 3-tiered nooks run along each side. Linoleum on the basement landing!

Some of the old stuff is charming. I like the sturdy feel. I like that the pipes chatter a tiny bit with certain water usage.

OTOH, these leaky old 1930 windows can kiss my patootie. And what passed for insulation back then is nothing by today's standards. And there aren't enough electrical outlets for all of today's gizmos!
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My uncle owned a grocery store, and he took credit! Can;t find that any more!
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