I'm getting a VACATION!!! and the WONDERS of HOSPICE for respite...

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Not life-ending hospice care, but HELPFUL to the CG. It's been a year and a half of taking care of my 98 yr old grandmother with mid-stage dementia by myself and I am FINALLY getting a BREAK!!! I am SOOOOOO excited I can hardly stand it. But when you have to pay for yourself and then for her stay at $100 a day on top of your accommodations, it's really hard to come up with that money...but recently her home health ran out to where Medicare would not pay for anything anyone to come out and bathe her, etc., so they suggested we try and get her on hospice - not end-of-life hospice, but continuity-of-care hospice, and it's been GREAT!! We have a dedicated nurse who comes in 2 times a week, and an aide who comes in 3 times a week and I don't have to pay for anything. They pay for her incontinence stuff, and her meds, and BEST OF ALL, they PAY FOR RESPITE TIME!!! And if something happens and I would take her to the hospital, I call them first and they come out and assess b4 I go to the hospital and get stuck in that ridiculous quagmire for hours, and if I do have to go, they go with me! So I don't know what it was that qualified her for their services - much like home health, they have to assess her and she has to be recertified every so often - but as long as they will certify her, I'm going to let them do their thing because it's a TON of weight off my back, and they help with so much financially, they really are a GOD SEND.


So, I'm just here trying to let folks know that just if your loved one is in a place that is hard to take care of on your own, try considering hospice. The stigma is there, that you have to be dying within 6 months, but that is no longer the case...some patients actually get better on hospice and go back to home health!! So, consider it to be a WIN for yourself as a CG, to your bank account, and just to have someone else there to handle the load with you...

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Oh my God I did not know this! I am going to check into this immediately. I want a vacation!!!!
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Worried, Hubby is bedridden and all the meds he’s on are for “status quo” so to speak and not curative. To be brutally honest, he needs to be in a facility, but we don’t qualify for Medicaid. Whatever is done for him needs to be done at home. I’m most interested in the incontinence supplies as they’re very expensive and we use so many of them. We get shut down at every turn, and quite frankly, I’m getting tired of begging for no reason
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Ahmijoy it sounds like you need in home support services not continuity hospice. There are some state programs that will pay for in home care. your husband would have to be approved for it, and they will determine how many hours he needs and then you’ll have to hire a caregiver or caregivers yourself and then they have to be approved by the IHSS program. (That’s how it works in CA at least). With continuity hospice, they provide palliative (comfort care) not life-prolonging care so I’m not sure that’s what you want? Good luck!
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Thank you, Grandma1954. I’ve done some research on Continuity of Care Hospice, but most of what I’ve read about it refers to end-of-life Hospice even when speaking of continuity of care. Hubby is not, at least I hope not, at this point. He needs more than home health care. He needs to be seen by a Visiting Nurse or a doctor who can keep tabs on his heart (he has congestive heart failure), BP (historically low), and things like podiatric care, etc. it would also be wonderful if we could have incontinence supplies paid for. It is becoming impossible for me to turn him over to bathe him and his skin is not in good shape. That also needs a doctor or nurse’s attention. I cannot get him out of the house due to mobility issues. No money to pay for handicap transport. We need help on many levels. I am going to call a local home health care agency tomorrow to see what they say.
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Ahmijoy, if you are asking about seeing if a person qualifies for Hospice there are conditions. The person must be diagnosed with a life limiting condition, must no longer be seeking treatment for the condition. Typically a diagnosis of 6 months is used but this is not a hard and set rule. There are times when a person is reevaluated to see if they are still appropriate for Hospice. the re-certifications are done about every 90 days. But as long as there is a documented, continued decline more than likely the person will remain on hospice.

Kannie, if you are asking about the aids from Hospice typically the CNA will come in 2 or 3 times a week depending on the circumstances. They will be there about 1 hour, more or less if the need is there. They will bathe, dress the person. They will usually check to see what supplies are needed. They usually will not stay there while you run out to get your hair done or go to the movie. (I did run out once because I needed milk and eggs. But I was back within 20 minutes)
All Hospice that are Medicare approved have Volunteers that can come in and sit with your loved one. Typically the time span is about 3 or 4 hours. They can not feed, give medications or change someone.

The best way to find out if your loved one qualifies is to call a few Hospice agencies and talk to them. Interview then just like you would any doctor, babysitter, employee. There are 2 types of Hospice Not for profit and For profit. The hospice I used was Not for profit.
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This sounds great but quick question. If your parent would need aides more than 3x per week are you allowed to use an agency Supplement aides?

Also, how long to the aides stay that come three times a week?
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I would love to take advantage of this! How do you go about finding out if you qualify? We aren’t connected to a home health care agency. Who do you call?
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I am very happy for you! Yay!
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Lisa9la - thanks for the ideas. I am considering more options now so I get respite.
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Celebrating your vacation in my heart! What great news. Thanks for sharing it with us -- we receive too little good news. And thanks for all the information about hospice from all of you.
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