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He is still insisting on investing the money coming in from cashing out old investments to provide money for his, and my, care in the future. We have hired a fiduciary who is a family friend but he insists on controlling. I am only hopeful that when the money comes in, he will have forgotten his desire to invest which was a hobby for him in the past and I would like to continue for his sake, but there is little to spare.

I agree. Your husband can no longer make informed decisions. And this is not the time to play the stock market. We have lost a lot of the interest we have made in the last 5 years. Not to the principle yet but if things don't turn around soon, we will be losing what we put in. At this point, we r holding on to bonds that are over 30 years old because we r afraid we will lose that money.

There is a possibility that your husband may need LTC within the next 5 years. You need to protect your half from Medicaid. I too suggest you see an estate lawyer versed in Medicaid to secure your future.
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Geaton is 100% correct. The fiduciary absolutely must be notified of your husband's status.
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Mollym, your profile says your husband has early stage ALZ. Is there any reason why you wouldn't discretely present this diagnosis to the fiduciary friend? This would be important info to disclose. It doesn't matter that the fiduciary is also a friend...there is a legal standard and professional code they must live up to or they can get into real trouble. Fiduciaries must act in their clients' best interests, and if your assets are joint and you are your hubby's PoA, I would think the fiduciary will need to listen to only your direction? Please consult an estate planning attorney to understand what is legally possible and wise. If your hubby wants to make risky or unwise investments, your friend/fiduciary may not be able to go along with it, and may need to resign your account. As an alternative, Alva has a good point about separating your assets from hubby's so that at least you are protected.
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Molly, you may want to meet with the fiduciary or one of your own now to separate out assets so that your own can be protected, because this is very worrisome. What he does to himself is OK, but what he does to you, honestly, isn't OK.
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