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It is so rare for me to react to what ever is being said or advertised but this really does annoy me as it gives a false hope to persons who may have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's and who read this garbage. Especially when we know sadly there is positively no known cure for Alzheimer's as of yet.

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It's similar to the weight loss schemes.....you know, eat whatever you want, whenever you want, including chocolate cake 4x a day and lose weight SO rapidly you may have to STOP taking these miracle pills that are only $60 a bottle!!! Or the get rich quick schemes the robots call us about on the phone at least twice a week.

Or or or.

The schemes are endless. It's sad how so many people get sucked in to the lies.
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Please, I'm so sick of people dishing out fake news. At least that one is transparent, it's the more complex one's written in technical and medical jargon with references that are harder to decipher and end up wasting more of your time.
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Advertisers exploiting the elderly angers me as well. Usually, the cure is not miraculously going to reverse dementia as one ad claims, and also these supplements are expensive. My husband cut out an article from the paper that was claiming to magically reverse dementia. He showed me, and I skeptically read it and researched their claims which led to articles about it interacting badly with other medications people take as well as causing serious stomach issues. I showed him this and that wasn't enough, so I suggested he bring it to his neurologist which he did. The neurologist shook her head saying that this supplement was not going to reverse his dementia. They have access to all of the research for what works and what doesn't, and that the disease is progressive and is not going to be reversed by a supplement from an ad in the paper. Those were not her exact words, but that was the idea of her answer. My husband was diagnosed last year, and is in moderate stage dementia, probably Alzheimer's. Then a few months later, forgetting that he had cut out that article and brought it to the neurologist, he cut it out again, and I told him "no, you already cut that out, we already brought it to the neurologist, and she already said it isn't going to work, and may hurt you more."
He also has the worst possible diet, with absolutely no desire to change it, or willpower to change it. He loves sugar, fried food and junk. He can come up with all kinds of excuses why this and that. His "upper GI doctor told him to add sweetener to his coffee to help him digest it." (Of course, she didn't, but that's what he says.) He has bought numerous bladder control supplements, and guess what, they don't work either. So much money down the drain, it makes me sick. I look forward to the day when I can legitimately take away the credit and debit cards, but then I don't look forward to that day for so many reasons. What on earth will I be dealing with then?

What a horrible ride this is that we are all on.
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I get so aggravated when advertisers exploit serious conditions with their nonsense in order to play upon people's desperation for a cure.
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There is a lot of evidence that Alzheimers might be type 3 diabetes, somehow
related to insulin resistance. But that isn't a quick fix, nor does it help with a
senior who can't or won't radically change their diet. Plus once the damage
is done it's another story.

Quick fixes tempt seniors to flit from one fad to the next. And can be pricey.
Oh and can also be the subject to hours of redundant conversations. My Dads gotten sucked into a few of these "hurry while supplies last" schemes that
always seem to be on a monthly billing schedule. Nothing quite like spending
hours on hold with customer service to cancel a useless fad subscription.
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They're advertising WHAT, Johnjoe?

Love us and save us, what will they come up with next - !

You could report the advertisers to the ASA (www.asai.ie) if you feel there's been a serious breach of the code.

It's the ads for equity release that get up my nose more than most. And the personal injury lawyers.

Ugh! - don't start me!
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I haven't seen that one Johnjoe but it's like all the other outrageous health claims for countless other products, sad and infuriating all at the same time. We are in an era of easily disseminated false information and it is up to all of us to be wise about our sources.
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WHy is is false hope? Be open minded and not afraid of information. Look at all those ads and how right they are in the end. Look at the folks reversing their diabetes lately doing paleo. All those gossip magazines often are right in the end. (Except for Celebrities giving birth to Aliens)
Regarding Alzheimers research.. There is alot of independant study being done right now that is not about one pill solutions but a broad systemic and lifestyl approach that puts protocols in place at the same time. Look up the work of Dr Dale Bredesen. I apply some of his methods and i have reversed many of my parents symtoms. For one, there is no more sundowning, and no more erratic behavior. Mood is very good. My dad plays ping pong, dances, and plays cards. At one point he was distraught and sleeping all day. Not anymore. I give probiotics, high fats in the morning, He has his super coffee at times but usually an espresso every morning , And it kick starts his metabolism.
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