I think my father has frontotemporal degeneration.

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I've had problems with my bipolar father for years, and today, I was reading about FTD, and it sounds just like him. He lives in his recliner, does nothing, hardly talks, won't clean himself, etc. How do I get him diagnosed? Does anyone have a loved one with FTD?

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I can't tell from your description of his behavior if I think that's what he has. I think real bipolar starts in young people, not just showing up later in life. Get the book "What If It's Not Alzheimers", edited by Lisa Radin and her son. Now in its third edition it is an excellent resource. It doesn't get diagnosed correctly all the time, which is a major concern. Our doctor never even heard of it.
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The only way to determine what it really is is to pursue further tests. I think I would based on what you have seen. It seems that we have to really be our own advocate and that for our loved ones. Let us know what you find out.
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I've done more research, and holy moly, FTD can cause delusions and euphoria and misdiagnosis of bipolar disorder! He went manic and insane in 2004, 2005, and 2013. He didn't have problems before that. It may have been FTD all along, and the other symptoms only appeared after his last psychotic event. How could none of the doctors ever considered this? The first time he was insane, they did do a brain scan of some kind to check for tumors but it may have been too early to see FTD damage. I am mad that I had to be the one to diagnose him and 12 years after this started! Do you think I'm right? I know being insane for so long in 2013 (over two months nobody would do anything) could also have caused FTD or FTD-like brain damage but it doesn't really matter which came first. The apathy is dominant but due to sitting in a chair for three years, his body is failing too.
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Check out the Association for FrontoTemporal Dementia AFTD. There you will find advice and information that may be helpful to you. Many patients refuse to go through testing to get a diagnosis. Many FTD patients have had an earlier diagnosis of bipolar or depression which was probably a misdiagnosis and was really early manifestation of FTD. Check out website for UCSF, Univ of Calif San Francisco neurology dept for discussion of symptoms and medication. I couldn't tell from your post how far the progression is in your situation, whether the apathy is dominant or if he physically unable to do more than you described. It's a long haul. Good luck.
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I believe you are thinking about if he's declared incompetent.

If he's compliant with immediate wishes, why can't you hire a bath aide (using his resources, of course)?

I'm sorry i don't recall your other posts.
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He has Medicare and AARP Supplemental insurance. He doesn't want any help. But, if he gets a diagnosis, it's my understanding, I can hire help against his wishes? Once someone is upon him to wash him, I have no idea what would happen but he's pretty compliant to taking immediate orders. He just almost never follows through on his own.
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Do you think that he would cooperate more and accept help if he received that kind of diagnosis? I know that you have reported that he is extremely resistant to help, refuses to allow you access to medical information and seems very intent on status quo. Would he allow someone to come into the home, like a bath aid?
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What insurance does he have? Will his doctor script some home care, a bath aide? Will he accrpt that sort of in home care?

Have you looked into getting him in to a long term care facility?
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We are going to see a psychologist next Wed for potential cognitive testing. He only agreed when his psych nurse and I worked with him for a while to get a yes. If he gets a diagnosis, is it true that care for him (someone to clean him mostly) would still not be covered by an insurance? That is so wrong. I haven't found him on the floor...yet.
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The next time he trips and falls, call 911. Insist that they transport him to check for internal injuries.
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