Daily Insulin Injections Needed, will Medicare assign a nurse to come to her house to administer the injections?

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My elderly mother, who lives alone, has diabeties and her doctor wants her to to take daily insulin injections but does not want her to do it. Will Medicare assign a nurse to come to her house daily to do this should we get a written prescription from her doctor?

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Thank you for this option Guestshopadmin. I have a mom in Florida that needs help administering insulin shot. She might as well be homebound, but we haven't checked to have her certified as such. She has a dining room for meals, but independent living for all else. She hasn't been on vacation, and only to store if we visit. No church, library.
one of us lives fairly close and can bring her some toiletries, juice, etc. , but cannot go every day.
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Medicare MIGHT cover, as KK noted, services of a Visiting Nurse under home health care IF the person is certified as HOMEBOUND. This has to be prescribed by a doctor. The requirements for being homebound can be quite stringent (no more restaurant meals, trips to store, family vacations, going to library at will, etc and no driving oneself at all). The patient is evaluated to see if they qualify as homebound and the services required. It's worth asking about. With regards to the assisted living facility, make sure that there are no fees associated with having outside groups administer the shots. But any kind of services like this start with a doctor's referral.
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I don't know what Medicare will provide in the form of a tech to visit the home and give insulin injections. It would be 7 days a week and every holiday, so, I can't imagine it would be inexpensive.

As a multiple insulin injector myself, I will confirm that the cartridges with screw on needles makes it very simple and easy, (NO MORE SYRINGES and vials for most patients), HOWEVER, if the patient has any memory problems or cognitive decline, it's very risky to have them do it. Overdosing the insulin could be fatal. I wouldn't trust reminders either.

Another factor to consider with a person who takes insulin and lives alone is low blood sugar. Most people who take insulin will encounter it eventually. If the person is not aware enough, they could pass out and even die. I'd be very cautious and consider other options for a senior living alone who needs to take insulin.
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Unless they are house- bound and receiving PT to make this better...no Medicare won't pay for this.

There are a lot of devices that make injections super simple to do.

If the doctor feels they cannot be depended upon to get the shot, that is a different problem. If they cannot remember or cooperate then they need either a family member to do it or they  probably need to be in a nursing home.
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I can't answer the specific question you asked but I do want to suggest you each have your elderly parents give it a shot (pun intended). The new injectables are extremely simple to use and easily self administered.

You dial the dosage and press a button
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I have this exact same issue with my father. Can somebody please provide some guidance? he is in an assisted living facility but they charge 1300 a month extra to provide injections. He can't afford this. Please advise.
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