Can a parent pay a a family member to be a care giver.

Follow
Share
This discussion has been closed for comment. Start a New Discussion.
Find Care & Housing
21

Comments

Show:
1 2 3
This is what happened last night.. I moved 1000 miles and gave up a good paying job to care for my 90 father and 80 yr mother. I live in their home and they pay me 500 a month. (Very hard to live on) we applied to va benefits to help my financial situation for caring for them.. I was told by my mother I would not the 500 and that too which is fine.. She then stated what ever we get u may get half a month.. And the fight begins.. I am just so sad and not sure what to do at this point.. I can not convey to them that 500 is really nothing, I have no other job or health benefits.. Other siblings are scattered thru the us.. Not sure where to go from here
(0)
Report

If a person needs 24/7 care, then one person cannot do the caring. By definition, you would need three shifts of caregivers.

Does your mother have the funds to pay both you (her child) and two more shifts of caregivers daily?
(0)
Report

Mom needs 24/7 care one child would stay at her home to care other wants to put in a home both have 50/50 power of attorney how does this work
(0)
Report

Wonderful answers to most questions but not a most important question. How are taxes handled by the person receiving legitimately for services to be rendered a lump sum payment for a personal services contract for Medicaid purposes. Don't tell me to ask my CPA because I am the CPA and cannot find answers anywhere.
(0)
Report

chero62, just a curiousity question. I am DPO for my mother and the document strictly states I cannot charge agent fees to carry out my DPOA responsibilites, except in cases of reimbursement for out of pocket expenses. Does your POA allow for agent fees or is the money you receive for actual caregiver duties and room and board? Your answer could help me with a future situation for me.
(0)
Report

Yes of course they can especially if they are the POA. I take an "agents fee" every month as I had to quit my job/career to provide care for my InLaws. I shouldn't have to loose income to provide for my family because they are sick so I pay myself $2000 a month (that is $1000 per person not a lot but enough to cover my expenses). I also have them reimburse for things like the food, the extra cost to the utilities, gas for the car to take her to DR appts etc that I have incurred since my mother in law moved in. I keep receipts for everything that are expenses for both MIL and FIL and once a month reimburse myself for those expenses that are coming out of my pocket.

I really isn't about the money but without my income added to hubbies income my family would have to do without a lot of things they shouldn't have to do without so if I'm going to be at home providing the care I have to have that income still come in. No one should be strapped for cash just because they are providing care for a parent at home.

My mom use to charge my grandfather room and board each month to cover the costs of his care. If you talk to a CPA or Elder Estate Planning Attorney they can tell you what you can take and what you can't take. Every state is different.

For kr - you need an elder attorney to help you and your dad change things. You and He will have to go to court to have the guardianship changed (as someone should have had to go to implement the guardianship in the first place)

one of the things a lawyer can help you with is to put your name on things like the deed to the house so if he passes the house becomes yours as you already own it as the survivor of the jointly owned property. If your dad is already been declared incompetent with a DR's note then the POA has been activated and it may be harder to do things but If there isn't a doctors note saying he is incompetent then technically he can still change things but you do need an attorney's guidance here.
(0)
Report

There is a caveat to what Ralph Robbins posted, as I have just found this out myself.
The VA allows up to 2050 a month to take care of both parents. The way they set it up when they check for liquid assets to determine financial support is they check for total expenditures (including cost of caregiver,mortgage , and all other bills ) and it must exceed the amount he makes each month.
So when I asked the advocate for the VA he said we must present cancelled checks from my parents and to me for what they are paying me but it must be greater than their total income, and on completely separate accounts. Which really confused me at first, especially if the max is only 2050. Basically my father has to write me a check for everything he takes in from his pension and Social Security, then the Va will reimburse him 2050.00 Then from my account I can either pay his bills or electronically transfer the difference back to him, there by getting 2050.00 for caring for them. This benefit is for veterans and their spouses and is tax free. Im starting to think that's how they made it tax free, this way I'm not an employee.
(0)
Report

I am living with my 84 year old Mother me and my husband moved in with her in feb. we had to give up our jobs and my husband took early retirement and only gets 565 a month. my Mother signed the house over to us and gave us some money. she also had me transfer money from her savings to a account of mine. if she goes into a nursing home say about a year from now do I lose it all? I read that If I am living with her for 2 years before she has to go into a home I don't lose the money or house is that true. and do I have to pay taxes on the money or house?
(0)
Report

kr...

I think a better idea would be to patch things up with your family. You all have a common cause: Dad's care. A house divided...

Otherwise, guardianship can only be changed by a judge. You and/or your father or even a third party can petition the court. Your sister will have the opportunity to respond. The judge may get fed up with all of you and nominate an independent guardian. Then the only thing all of you will have to worry about is loving your father.

So why not skip that middle step?
(0)
Report

PatCornish...

There is a difference as to how compensation is calculated and how compensation is paid. I do not know about MN, but in most states where the technique is permitted compensation is calculated hourly and can be paid in any manner the parties agree to.

Again, if Medicaid is not contemplated, it doesn't matter.
(0)
Report

1 2 3
This discussion has been closed for comment. Start a New Discussion.
Related
Questions