Are you out of the loop when it comes to modern technology?

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I saw this discussion within another discussion so I thought I would bring it here. I still use a desktop computer, have no idea how old is my tower. And I still have a flip phone. I am lucky I know how to cut & paste.... [sigh]. My office recently hired a "Social Media Coordinator" as my boss and I are totally clueless on what to do. I don't have Facebook, never Twittered, no snap-chatting here [whatever that is], have no idea what is Instagram. At least I know the names :)) Did any of the above help me with caregiving? Only the Internet and this website for information !!

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GardenArtist, I remember back when brand new cars had options that one could purchase. Want an FM radio, that was an option :) Air conditioning also an option, otherwise one would open up the vents on the side walls to get in air.

Even seat belts were an option to which my Dad would order back in the 1960's [it wasn't until the 1990's before Mom would even wear a seat as she didn't want her dress to get wrinkled].

Tire skirts anyone? Another option. Metal sun-visor on the top of the front windshield?

The glove box was actually used for gloves :) Separate snow tires?
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I can't remember the last time I bought a ticket either....probably 40 or more years ago.

Life has become too complicated; I think I'll find some land near a forest and escape from civilization. Homesteading had been a plan of mine several years ago.

All this sounds like another step to capture personal information and commoditize and dehumanize us. Eventually perhaps we'll be known by numerical IDs - caregiver no. 1,000,000 or something totally impersonal.

Maybe it's time to start paying cash and become more anonymous.
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Most tickets are electronic so you print them off your email or they scan your phone.

They are promoting this as "job creation". They can classify workers as servers and pay $3.10 an hour and the stadium is the only place that I dont tip 20% because a beer at $8.75 a pop is already just crazy.

With the biometrics they want to record your attributes and have you put a credit credit card in the system so when you gesture you need something, they will bring it to you and do the charge with your fingerprint. Its just stupid.
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GA, I think one advantage for the innocent consumer is that it stops touts from pinching or cloning your tickets! Organised crime hasn't been slow to get involved in identity theft.

I do speak as one who can't remember when I last went to the sort of game you have to buy tickets for, mind.
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Tacy, what's the point of using facial recognition technology unless it's to identify suspects and/or criminals? Or are they concerned about scalped tickets?

I don't understand how this will help concession sales, unless they're going to add chocolate milk shakes if there are more women and hot dogs if there are more men...something like that. Or if they're going to improve the bathrooms, or something of that nature.

Otherwise, I think it's not only a violation of privacy, it's an egregious violation of privacy.

A friend year ago moved to a gated community and warned me that when I visited, the gatekeeper would ask to see my ID, photo it, and photo my license plate as well. I said we would have to find a different place to get together.

Private sector data gathering of personal information is intrusive enough as it is. No way is some unknown person going to copy my driver's license!

Good for your for taking a stand on this.
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I was just listening to sports radio having a discussion about technology. The MLB is working on a deal with the TSA to buy biometric technology (facial recognition and fingerprints) for tickets and to help concession sales. Some teams are already doing this for season ticket holders...at their expense. I go to Comerica alot but if they do this, I will boycott. Just feel it is a violation of privacy .
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CM, human evolution to master texting is in fact something I've wondered about. Are you seeing signs of additional appendages on your daughter's fingers yet? I suspect thumbs will eventually grow to massive proportions.

I'm surprised, as you were by the TV techs, to hear more young people commenting on the rapid pace of accelerating technology change. I think for some it's an adventure, others are pulled along by conformity to mass behavior, and some might just be getting tired of buying and buying more and more.

I wonder how much the dedicated devotees have put aside to pay off their cars or save for a house. And I wonder how much they'll have saved for their care when they're 50 - 60 + years older.

Clever therapist! Imagine that someone needs to share a presence on Twitter. That's really sad. That's worse than my sharing my weeding activities.

Appliances: I think they've become unnecessarily complex, and it hasn't affected their function. Ovens still need to heat regardless of how many steps required to turn them on. Washers still need to clean.... where are the basics of function going? What's more important? Gadgets or the basic purpose? I'm still battling the microwave to get it to heat at % power. The instructions are, well, useless.

FF, if only the cost of cars would come down; there's just too much stuff that not everyone wants or needs, driving the costs up.
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Caregiverology: "My issue lies with how rapidly technology is changing." I have a similar concern, but I try to balance by asking myself how much of this technology change is for the better, and for the good of people? I don't want to spend time to learn something that's going to change in this year, or the next....like the software updates for WIN.

I'm thinking of advances in medical technology, in diagnostic applications, in treatment methodology. Good applications, benefitting humanity as opposed to glitzy consumer products.

Funding for research obviously is an issue, and I find that somewhat ironic as it's more important than funding for a new talking machine to provide a weather forecast.

I've been thinking about how this trend began and how it's sustained. There has to be a demand and people willing to buy the consumer products. I wonder how many of them would provide an equal amount of money for medical research funding.


Smeshque, I too loved the written word, letters from across the "Big Pond", Australia, Germany and Japan when I was really actively corresponding in writing. The Japanese writers would send photos of their home area. They sent samples of rice paper, so delicate, and reminded me of the delicacy of the Geisha life and the beauty and peace of their garden designs. Somewhere I still have the beautiful fans they also sent. I often felt as if I had been to Japan, even though I haven't.

My German friend wrote in English, German and French. That was probably the time I was more prolific in language skills than I've been since. And it was exhilarating, to learn another language, sense the nuances and feel a part of that culture. She used to send little gifts made from braided wheat straw, opening my thoughts to growing my own wheat and using it not only to make flour but to make little ornaments.

That was when I started designing my own stationery, and had so much fun coloring the little cards I made. There's so much creative challenge in designing something to send to someone.


CW, thanks for the memories of turn of the century life, although that was long before me. But it was a more leisurely lifestyle; people knew how to enjoy life. I think so often of nostalgic scenes, and family memories...of driving up to one of the fishing ports, sitting on the dock fishing, and enjoying the home caught meal after returning home when Mom added her magic touches to our catch.

I remember WIN '95; my father was the tech leader and first to buy a computer. I remember grounding myself when I did something to open the case; I have no idea now what it was I did, but I didn't short out the computer; that was an issue then.

BTW, Clive Cussler the author has a collection of vintage autos, all sorts of styles and names I've never heard of. Greenfield Village and the Henry Ford Museum also have collections, including early steam trains, autos, wringer washing machines (we had one until automatic washers were invented). A visit to either the Village or Museum is like stepping back in time. And I think it's about time for another visit.

We went to one of the Christmas events. Old fashioned streetlamps cast light on snow covered streets, and candles lit the windows of the buildings we visited. All the decoration was period style. There were no flashing LED strings of lights, no thousands of decorations or lights enveloping homes like giant squids.

The path eventually ended at one of the eateries, with wassail and other delicacies which I probably consumed with gusto after the invigorating walk.
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I remember back when color printers were around $5k-$10k to purchase. Personal computers were also quite expensive. I figured out that the cost per pound was more than that of a car !!
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Speaking of stoves... I remember back when stoves had a large red light on the control panel to let you know the oven or a burner was still on. No forgetting to turn it off :))

My newer stove has tiny red rights the size of a pin head.... not much help. If I walk past the stove and feel heat, then I know one of us forgot to turn it off.
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