The AgingCare.com forum is filled with people coming together to share valuable information. We’ve compiled experienced caregivers’ suggestions for keeping a loved one cozy, content and clean in spite of cold winter weather.

Winter Skincare Tips

“Although many people use baby oil, it contains mineral oil and artificial fragrances. If your loved one has any chemical sensitivities (and a lot of older people do), it is best to stay away from any artificial fragrances, artificial ingredients and mineral oil. Try organic coconut oil for soothing and moisturizing dry skin. It is simple and very effective. I also recommend visiting a good health food store and asking about lotions that are all natural.” –oceansong

“My primary care physician (whom I hold in very high regard) recommends Eucerin lotion products. They are a little pricey, but they last forever. I think they also make a lotion specifically for diabetics.” –Miasmom1

“Many of us love the bath or shower to be very hot, especially when it is cold outside. However, high temperatures can be very drying for the skin. I know my hands also become super dry in colder weather. I tried just about everything, but my hands felt like I had a dozen paper cuts and I looked like I was attacked by my cats! Then I found O’Keefe’s Working Hands Hand Cream. It’s mainly advertised to men, but I tried it and so far, so good! It can be found in grocery stores and hardware stores.” –freqflyer

“My mom developed dry, irritated skin last winter, and I thought she was having an allergic reaction. When we went to the doctor, he called it ‘winter itch’ (a seasonal type of eczema). It was all over her body and, of course, she has opened some areas on her skin. We are using antibiotic ointment and heavy cream specially forumlated for eczema. This has helped a great deal in just a couple of days!” –Seastar

Staying Warm While Bathing in Winter

“Temperature! Turn up the central heat to keep the bathroom warm during bath time. Seniors are often cold, even when we are wearing short sleeves. If there is cold tile in the bathroom, cover it with a plush bath rug and make sure they don’t fall. If you have an overhead heater, turn that on, too. Wear light clothing so you do not get totally overheated while helping them!” –homeandhearth

“A radiant heater panel can be especially useful for bathrooms. During fall and winter, mine is plugged into a motion sensor timer that you set for automatic shut off. We have it set to go on when motion starts, and it goes off when no motion is detected for five minutes. It makes the bathroom warm (I go and trigger it before Mom goes into the bathroom for a shower), and there’s no risk of it tipping over because it’s anchored to the wall.” –glasshalffull

“I purchased a small fan heater for our bathroom. My loved one gets cold easily, especially since the water is not running on her constantly because she uses a shower seat while bathing.” –Anonymous6636

Ending the Thermostat Wars

“As people age, typically the circulation in their extremities (arms and legs) diminishes, causing them to feel cold. Any time you go to a senior living center, you’ll see older people dressed far more warmly than younger people because the seniors are chilly. They’ll even wear sweaters when it’s hot and humid outside. Low thyroid can be another cause of being cold, so be sure to get that checked. My mom’s thyroid quit working about two years ago. Once we got her on thyroid medications and got the dose regulated, she felt warmer and had more energy.” –blannie

“Last winter (out of desperation), my husband and I installed a programmable thermostat and we put it high enough that Mom can’t reach it to crank the heat up. It has worked so well without having to leave notes or try to remind her not to touch it.” –chrisblair63

“I use a Sunbeam heating pad on the back of my dad’s chair. I just saw that Sunbeam and Sure Fit offer heated slip covers, too. As for me, I have been spared by a tall Dyson fan. It makes very little noise and feels like the air it puts out is cooled even though it isn’t. I set it up pointed directly at my chair. It can also oscillate, but the stationary position is perfect since my dad does not feel it and I do. This setup has kept him warm and me cool—something that many caregivers struggle with.” –pipruby

“If you get an electric blanket, make sure it has a cutoff temperature. My mom hates my electric heating pad for her back because it will only keep a high temperature for so long and then it turns off as a safety feature. I told her it’s better than falling asleep on it and getting burned.” –timbuktu

“Beanbag/microwavable heat packs can be heated and strategically placed at the hip, stomach, back and feet. They also make a slipper version that has helped my mom with the Raynaud’s syndrome in her feet.” –glasshalffull

Indoor and Outdoor Safety Tips

“My dad has two walkers. There is one that he leaves in the garage after going all over the yard and through the snow/dirt. Mom won’t let him in the house with it unless he cleans it off, so Dad just bought another walker for indoor use only.” –freqflyer

“Your loved one’s favorite holiday decoration may be a fifty-year-old menorah or Nativity scene with incandescent bulbs. On all décor, check thoroughly for dried and cracking wires and loose connections on the plug. It may have been perfectly safe for many years, but old wiring causes many fires this time of year.” –pamstegma

“A word of caution: canes are terrible on ice. If your loved one needs someone or something to help them walk, it is better that they stay indoors until the weather improves. If they need to get out and about, have someone meet them at home to help them on snowy, icy walkways.” –freqflyer

“I worry when my mother-in-law runs the temperature up higher in her home due to her tendency to get dehydrated. Each and every time she has been hospitalized, it has been because of dehydration. It is common knowledge that it is easier for seniors to get dehydrated when it is hot outside, but it is also a serious issue during winter, especially for those who have trouble getting enough liquids. Help them hydrate any way you can!” –oldcodger2