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10 Things You Should Know About Your Parent's Finances

35 Comments

Good point. something to keep looking into maybe...Thanks!

@Debi58,
Every long-term care insurer has a different way of evaluating one's health history.

Some A+ rated long-term care insurers will insure someone with a BMI as high as 43.0. Other long-term care insurers won't insure anyone with a BMI higher than 36.0.

Every company uses different criteria for determining who they can and cannot insure. That's why it's important to work with an independent agent who represents lots of different companies and specializes in long-term care insurance.

Scott


One more tip...if you are overweight or obese...don't even bother...they won't even look at you....which is sad because not all overweight poeple develope diabtes, etc. My daughter's friend's dad was just told he has type 2 diabetes...and he is as thin as a rail. I on the other hand am overweight, low blood pressure, no diabetes...and was refused. Go figure! Sounds biased to me...

I think I would ask an elder law lawyer...to me something doesn't sound right here...

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What do I do? I have had my mother's power of attorney since 1997. This summer my 90 year old uncle went to the bank with my 88 year old mother (who has dementia) and had the bank give him the power of attorney over her bank accounts. So, I have power of attorney, but no access to her finances. At this point, my sister and I have started thinking that a nursing home might be the best place for our mother. But my uncle is opposed to the idea. What do I do?