When I think back 10-15 years, is it possible I was seeing signs of my mother having Alzheimer's way back then?

Asked by

I remember being angry at my Mom's "friend",who lived with her, because he asked if I"d noticed my Mom 's behavior had changed.(said she was acting strange) I thought he underminded her self confidence.Now I wonder if ,perhaps,he was reacting to subtle changes in her personality.The kind of things I see now because I live with her,that I wouldn't notice otherwise.

Answers 1 to 2 of 2
Insane I'm sure you're not alone in your thinking. I too think that perhaps I missed signs but was it because I was ignorant to this disease, or because I just didn't spend enough time thinking about it.

Now I can't beat myself up about it, I can only do what needs to be done and that is the best we can do, jump on it when it hits home.

We'll be alright.
I totally understand about not knowing what the "red flags" of dementia or Alzheimer's. My family decided to have my mother take a cognitive test when we all agreed mother "wasn't acting like her normal self" for the past six months. We were referred to the Neuropsychology Unit for an assessment. We understand it will be a four hour appointment and will serve as a baseline to assess any changes to her cognitive ability. We're hoping this will help us help mother. Here's what I found on Google...
"Clinical neuropsychologists perform a number of tasks, usually within a clinical setting. They are often involved in conducting neuropsychological assessments to assess a person's cognitive skills, usually after some sort of brain injury or neurological impairment. This may be for the purposes of planning treatments, to determine someone's neurocognitive functioning or mental capacity (often done for presentation as evidence in court cases or legal proceedings) or to detect changes over time.

Share your answer

Please enter your Answer

Ask a Question

Reach thousands of elder care experts and family caregivers
Get answers in 10 minutes or less
Receive personalized caregiving advice and support