We cannot find my mother-in-law's will that states me and my daughter are getting her inheritance. What happens when she passes?

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If you were told by your Mother-in-Law that you and her grandaughter(my daughter) were the only two people in her will except for a "Son-in-Law", who is now deceased. We cannot find her "Will". She said my daughter was "Executor of her Estate". What happens now. My Mother-in-Law is not mentally able to change her will and we can't find the will. So will everything automatically go to my daughter or will I still get half since Terry (son-in-law) has passed away??

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If a will cannot be produced the estate will go to "heirs in line". My daughter had that happen - she was the closest heir but the old uncle and aunts wanted a piece of the pie...it didn't happen.

so whoever is the closest heir in line would get it. In our state anyway. I sure hope you find it!!
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How long ago was this will drawn up. Are there any other family members besides yourself in her life. Does she remember who did the paper work.Was it done by a lawyer or was it homemade. A COPY OF THE WILL SHOULD ALWAYS BE WITH THE PERSON ON THE RECEIVING END,OTHERWISE IT COULD DISAPPEAR .
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HI! I would think that such a legal document-if prepared by an attorney would be someplace in his files-or with your state bureau of records. As previouly mentioned a safe deposit box is where it may also be found.
I am not sure-however if there is no will involved-does it go into probatate?
Good luck!
Hap
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Sometimes a will is filed with the clerk of court in the county the person lives in.

Sometimes, but not always does a lawyer have a record or copy of said will which is what I ran into.

One things that does help is finding out from other relatives if such a will ever existed which helped me.

Older people can often hide things better than even a detective can find. My mother hid hers from 1979 until two years ago in her mother's lock box in another city which only her brother knew about. It remained there even after her mother died and was paid for each year by the estate. That much information helped me know that it existed, but my mother's dementia was such that her mind was no help. After quite a scavenger hunt in the house, I did find it and I saw why she hid it from my step-dad because after being married to him for 11 years, she wrote him out of her will. Her will makes me the executor and the sole recepter of all that she owns; has ever bought or has ever been given as a gift or as an inheritance. She made me trusteee of 9 peices of farm land inherited from her mother plus had my step-dad sign a noterized statement to the effect that he is not interested in that land which does produce a yearly income. 6 years ago she made me co owner of her private accounts in a state credit union here with my sons as benefactors if I were to die. Last year, she gave me the right to survivorship of her private securities.

Good luck with your sear for the will. Sometimes, they are hidden among other papers or at the bottom of a box full of jewelry or something obscure like buttons, or in a family Bible or some favorite book or underneath a drawer which you can only see if you take the whole drawer out. Hardly ever are they found in a safety deposite box. In my mother's case, it was in an envelope that looked like a normal letter underneath one of her several jewelry boxes in this overly stuffed drawer toward the back corner. Unless I had felt the whole bottom of that drawer, I am sure that I would not have found it.
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it should have been filed with the county... also check with the Attorney, he should have a copy also. Hopefully that helps you... take care..
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If the will was drawn up by an attorney in her state, there will be a copy of it on file at their office.
It is my understanding (I'm not an attorney) that if a person dies intestate (without a will) the assets go to the nearest blood relative (or divided among blood relatives of the same order). If there are no remaining blood relatives, then the state steps in and decides what to do with the proceeds.
Does she have any other legal papers that might lead you to her family attorney? There must be a document of some sort ie: a will or living trust. Also, are these types of documents filed with her city/count/state? Check there too. You really need to see an attorney.
Good luck
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