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Yes, I think you should start with your case worker. It may be true that you are an excellent resident and the facility would like to keep you, but your case worker's job is to work in your best interests. Maybe your worker will jump right in and help you. Or maybe he or she will try to talk you out of moving. Listen carefully the reasons. If they don't seem genuine to you, you can talk to an ombudsman about your concerns. This is a person hired by the state to look into conflicts and complaints concerning residential facilities.

You mentioned a sister. Could she help you through this process?

I don't know exactly how the process to get a new court order works, but I think you should be prepared with a list of evidence that you can now take care of yourself, and also what plans you have to prevent problems. For example, if drinking causes problems for you, how will you be able to stay away from drinking? Be prepared to explain this.

And here is something to think about: if you have mild dementia now, you are likely to have moderate dementia some day, and then after that, perhaps severe dementia. No one knows how soon this may happen. Perhaps you'll have many years of independent living ahead of you. But if your dementia gets worse, you may be less and less able to live on your own. The real problem is that you may not recognize that. Is there someone (your sister?) who sees you often and who you could trust to keep an eye on you for that? Could you have a case worker who would check on you quarterly or so, to make sure you are still safe living on your own?

If it turns out that you can't get authorization to move, are there things that could be changed for you where you are that would give you more independence? Go for the move, first. And if that doesn't pan out, discuss the possibility of changes where you are with your case worker.

I sincerely wish the best for you.
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Yes I do have a casmanager/soial worker,is that who I could be directing my involvement in moving on,I'm afraid that because I do'nt have any needs like the rest of the residents here,that I'm perfect,so they do'nt want me to move on
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And you are now thinking that you would like to again live on your own?

Since you are there by court order, I imagine that you would have to convince the court that you are now able to live independently. Do you have a case worker who can guide you through the steps to start this reevaluation process?
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I also think after living here,that I can live on my own again
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I'm 52,always lived on my own or sober housing in different states briefly,& decided to move back to Wi. because my sister was saying that it was becoming time consuming,I moved back,realised my mother was worse off than I expected,started drinking,which I should not have done,not knowing I had dementia,& that put me here
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Where would you like to move to? Another CBRF? The home of a relative? On your own?

Apparently the court decided that it wasn't in your best interest to live alone. Has anything changed that might change the court's mind?
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